Do I Claim Zero, One, Two W-4 Allowances?

Posted by on October 23, 2016
Last modified:
Being aware of the number of allowances you are claiming on a Form W-4 is important for a variety of reasons.

The last thing you want to do is frantically run up to your boss asking “How many allowances do I claim on my W-4?”.

Being aware of the number of allowances you are claiming on a Form W-4 [Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate]  is important for a variety of reasons. Most importantly, the number of allowances you claim on a W-4 determines the following;

  1. how much tax will be taken from your income (aka the withholding amount)
  2. the size of your tax refund

Steps to filling out a W-4

You’ll need to following four simple steps when filling out your W-4 Form:

  1. Fill out your personal information (Name, Date of Birth, Address, Marital Status)
  2. Know the number of personal and dependency exemptions you are claiming on your tax return.
  3. Based on the number from step 2, use that number to help determine your number of allowances.
  4. Don’t forget to sign the W-4 and turn it into your employer!

The allowances you claim while filling out a W-4 if you are single will differ from the allowances you claim if you are married or have kids. 

Claiming zero allowances

  • The maximum amount of tax is withheld. Meaning, when it comes time to file your tax return you will most likely receive a refund.
  • You’re being claimed as a dependent on someone else’s tax return.

Claiming one allowance (ideal if you are single with one job)

  •  You’re single and have one job. Claiming one allowance will most likely result in a refund when you file your taxes.

Claiming two allowances

  • You are single. Claiming two allowances will get you close to your tax liability but may result in tax due when filing your taxes.
  • You’re single and work more than one job. Claim one allowance at each job or two allowances at one job and zero at the other.
  • You’re married.

Claiming three allowances

  •  You are married with one child.

Claiming additional allowances

  • File as head of household if you are eligible. You are able to claim additional allowances.
  • You had at least $2,000 of child or dependent care expenses that you plan on claiming credit
  • You’re eligible to claim the Child Tax Credit

Can I fill out a new W-4 form?

Yes, employees can submit a new W-4 form to their employee at any time during their employment. Have you recently started a second job, had a baby, or tied the knot? Life changes such as these should encourage you to update your W-4 withholding.

A great tool to help you while filling out a W-4 is the IRS Withholding Calculator,  located on the IRS website.

Claiming zero allowances means less take home pay, but a bigger tax refund during tax season.

The number you report on a W-4 will ultimately determine your take home pay and your tax refund. Don’t write down any number. Take the few extra minutes to really assess your situation and fill in the W-4 accordingly. By doing so you’re less likely find yourself in a difficult financial situation.

Then, when you’re ready to file your taxes, you’ll have a heads up on whether or not you’ll be receiving a tax refund!

Being aware of the number of allowances you are claiming on a Form W-4 is important to control your income.

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1,334 Responses to “Do I Claim Zero, One, Two W-4 Allowances?”

  1. Lil says:

    I am married and my husband still live together with 3 children. Last year we filled for taxes jointly including all our children as dependant and of course me though i was not working.

    Now I got a job and I am wondering if i should also claim our 3 children as dependents on the W4 since my husband has already included them on his form. We don’t want to get to a situation where we owe the IRS. please advise. Thanks

    • Ernie Martinelli says:

      Lil,

      Each child can only be claimed once.

      Ernie

      • JRL says:

        Lil
        You are confusing deductions with allowances. Claiming 3 allowances on your W-4 will give you more money during the year and a smaller refund at tax time. At tax time, when you file a joint return, together you will claim 3 deductions for the kids. Since you file a joint return, the 3 allowances on the W-4 is OK

        • Diana says:

          Hey there , hopefully you see this comment.
          So my husband works and I started to also. I put 0 as my allowance but we have 3 kids. Can I change that to 3 allowances? We will file together and he is the head of household. I don’t want to get into any trouble at tax time and owe money.

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Diana,

            Something to keep in mind when completing your W-4 form is that it only serves as an estimate to your employer for how much of your income should be withheld each paycheck to cover the taxes you owe to the IRS. Claiming a low number of allowances allows for more money to be withheld from each paycheck and will result in a refund or less of a tax amount due. Claiming a higher amount of allowances will allow for less to be withheld and will usually result in a smaller refund or more tax due after filing. With each dependent that you will be claiming on your tax return, you can claim one allowance on your W-4 form. Assuming you will be claiming all three children come tax time, they can all be claimed as allowances on your W-4 form.

            What you want to be sure of is that you and your husband are not BOTH claiming three allowances. I suggest splitting them between your W-4 forms. It is typically most beneficial financially, when filing a joint return, for the spouse earning a higher income to claim the majority of allowances. If you both claim three allowances, then you will most likely have a tax amount due to the IRS because not enough tax was withheld from your paychecks throughout the year.

      • hayley says:

        I am a single mother and have 1 child. Im married but we do not live together and file our taxes separately. Im trying to figure out if it is better to go exempt on my w4 form or claim head of house hold and claim allowances.

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Hayley,
          There are more tax incentives if you file as head of household. In other words, you’ll get a larger tax refund when filing. As for your W4 form, if you do claim Head of Household, I would suggest claiming 2. If you are claiming the child as a dependent on your tax return, you can claim 3 on your W4 and will receive larger paychecks.

          • Lesley says:

            I have a quick question. I am married but not living with each other. I filed head of household. I am trying to figure out how to receive a bigger paycheck and not as much of a large refund. I am currently claiming S1 but I still receive a large refund. Should I claim S3 or M3? Thank you

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Lesley,

            The most financially beneficial filing status is married filing a joint tax return, as in you will pay the least amount of tax with this status.

            When it comes to allowances, the more you claim, the less is withheld from your paychecks. On the other hand, the less allowances you claim, the more is withheld from your paychecks.

            Based on your preference to have less of a refund and increased take-home pay, your best bet would be to claim married with 3 allowances.

    • Deb says:

      Ok. So when the IRS issues a refund, it does not pay you interest on that pre-paid bill.
      If you owe tax on April 15th BUT CANNOT PAY, you will have to pay both penalty and interest. However..if you owe & can pay, you will not have any additional burden. If you can estimate your tax obligation and save that over the year in an interest bearing account the you are golden–claim the highest number of allowances to get your Fed withholding down.

    • Niccole says:

      You BOTH should NOT claim the children on your taxes. If he has already done so, it is better to just keep it at that. You cannot get a tax break twice on them. You will end up at the end of the year OWING money. You should claim “0” honestly b/c I can most likely assume you make less income & your income is probably supplimental. I myself have 1 child, I claim “0” && have them take out an additional $20/week… At the end of the year I am guaranteed to recieve my general taxes + that $ ($1,040) Now think of vacation $… You’re supplimental income just went a little bit further didn’t it?

    • Adrienne says:

      Hello, I am single with one dependent. I go to school and live with my mother. I do pay rent & other expenses (food, cable, WiFi etc.). I buy monthly transit passes and catch taxis daily. I claim two exemptions due to my monthly expenses but I’d like to see a nice refund! Do I change my allowances to 0 or keep everything the same? HELP before it’s too late please!

      • Tax Advisor says:

        Hi Adrienne,

        Assuming that you are not being claimed as a dependent on your mother’s taxes, I would advise you to claim one allowance for yourself and an additional allowance for your daughter. This should allow for a decent refund while also having less withheld from your paychecks than if you were claiming zero allowances.

        • Elise Word says:

          Hi there,

          I am single (no kids) not married, just started a new job, what do I put (0-1) for Fed. withholding? Any response is much appreciated!

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Elise,

            Congrats on the new job!
            Based on the information you have provided above, those in your tax situation tend to claim between zero and two allowances. Claiming zero allowances will pretty much guarantee you a tax refund after filing for the year but it will allow your employer to withhold the maximum amount of tax from your paychecks over the year. Claiming two allowances will allow you to have more take-home pay but could have you end up owing the IRS a small amount after filing if too little tax is withheld from your paychecks throughout the year. Claiming one allowance may be your best choice. This will have enough tax withheld from your paychecks over the course of the year that you break even with the IRS after filing. If you complete your W-4 and submit it to your employer later realizing that too little or too much is being withheld from your income, you can update your W-4 at any point during employment and your employer is required to have it go into effect immediately for the next pay period.

  2. Laura says:

    I am single, Head of household with 1 dependent child. What allowance should I claim to get the least amount of taxes taken out of my paycheck? I’m not concerned with the refund just want a bigger paycheck.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Laura,
      I would suggest claiming 3 on your W-4. The higher the number you claim, the less taken out in taxes from your paycheck, although a number too high will force you to pay tax due when filing your taxes. In your case, 3 should be just right.

      • Kim says:

        I have the same status as Laura, however, my mom is suggesting I put exempt on my tax claim because I am barely starting a part time job at the middle of this month and its only $10 an hour which won’t amount to a whole lot by the time tax filing us due. She says to change my filing status as of the start if the new tax year and claim 0 because I myself would like to get a bigger refund.
        I am a widow with one child and head of house hold. Also what is child tax? And what are the qualifications? Thank you
        ~Kim

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Kim,

          I suggest claiming 3 however, you can always claim less on your W-4. Claiming less will help to ensure that you are having enough tax withheld from each paycheck.

          The Child Tax Credit is an important tax credit that may be worth as much as $1,000 per qualifying child depending upon your income. I also suggest taking a look at the Child Tax Credit IRS website page to see if you qualify to claim this.

        • TG says:

          Kim, I highly feel that your tax return will come up as red flagged if you are head of house hold supporting yourself and a child working part time making only $10 per hour. You are obviously recieving income elsewhere which will have to be included in your tax return.

          • Amber says:

            That is not true. I have claimed head of house hold working part time making only 8 dollars an hour. And I have 2 children. We do not receive income elsewhere. It really depends on the area too. But it won’t make the taxes come up with a red flag….

      • Cassie says:

        Hello! I am a head of household, single and no children. I am a server making 2.13/hour and have had to pay taxes around tax return time in the past. I believe then I claimed 0. The form suggests I claim 3, but want to know best option so I will not have to owe money in the end. Thanks for your advice!!!

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Cassie,

          The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

          • Ndeye Salamba Sylla says:

            Hey I work two parttime jobs. I am married but dont live with him because he is in africa. I have one daughter and pregnant. I want a huge tax refunds and a big pay check. Yet I dont want to owe the irs money at the end. So what should I put on each of my 2 w2 form. Please

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hello Ndeye,

            With two income sources, it is smart to either split the allowances between both jobs or claim all allowances on your W-4 for the higher paying job. If you would like a larger refund come tax time, then you want to claim less allowances. On the other hand if you want to see more in your wallet each pay period, you’ll want to claim more on your W-4. Keep in mind that although claiming a higher amount of allowances will allow you to see more money throughout the year, this increases the likelihood of you owing the IRS after filing.

          • Ciera says:

            Hello. I am single, head of household with a full time and part time job. I have no children, how many allowances should I claim at each job?

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Ciera,

            The first thing that I recommend doing is double checking that you qualify as Head of Household for tax purposes. Based on the information you have provided above, you aren’t supporting a “qualifying person”. The eligibility requirements are as follows:

            1. You must be unmarried as of December 31 AND
            2. You must have paid over half of the cost to run your home for the year (rent, mortgage, utilities…) AND
            3. You must have supported a qualifying person according to the IRS.

            If you do NOT qualify as head of household, I suggest that you claim one allowance. If you DO qualify as head of household, I suggest claiming two allowances on your W-4 form.

          • Tina says:

            Hello. So I’m single and would like to claim head of household. I really would love to have all my money now I don’t too much care for a big return. What number should I put on my w4? Help

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Tina,

            Prior to updating your W-4 form, it is important to know that the more allowances you claim, the less income is withheld from your paychecks. The less allowances you claim, the more income is withheld from your paychecks. You are issued a refund if too much is withheld and you owe a tax due if too little is withheld. That being said, you should increase your withholding amount from whatever amount you are claiming now so that less is withheld from your paychecks.

        • Christina says:

          From what I know, you can’t be “head of household” if you have no dependents. You are single with no children, with one job. You should claim 0 or 1. Anything else will probably have you owning taxes to IRS at the end of the year.

      • SHARI says:

        I HAVE THE SAME QUESTION AS LAURA BUT I AM MORE CONCERNED ABOUT THE REFUND! SHOULD I CLAIM 2 OR 3?

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Shari,

          Since you are more concerned about receiving a larger refund, you’ll want to claim 2 allowances instead of 3. This will allow for more to be withheld from each paycheck throughout the year, in turn having the IRS issue you a refund after filing.

          • Isabel says:

            Hello!

            Need your advice. For 2015, I claimed zero. However, I think I need to change that since Federal Tax $154, Social Security $114, Medicare $26 and VA State $76 are being deducted from my paycheck! YIKES! I never realized it until now.

            I am married, and have one child. We file together. I’m thinking to changing it to ONE or TWO, any advice? I do NOT like paying anything when it comes to submitting my taxes in the Spring. But I do like some return.

            Thanks for your help!

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Isabel,

            As of right now, you are having the maximum amount allowed withheld from your paychecks to cover taxes owed to the IRS. Since you are married and will be filing a joint tax return, a good rule of thumb for the both of you to follow is to each claim one allowance for yourselves and then the spouse earning the higher income claim an additional allowance for your dependent child. Therefore, one of you will claim one allowance and the other will claim two.

        • Tres says:

          I wouldn’t worry so much about the refund. You honestly want to come as close to breaking even on your taxes as you can. This will allow for more money through out the year to invest or save.

      • Joyce says:

        Im claiming 2 for my w4 n just wanted to know if I will get a tax return and if it would be a small tax return

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Joyce,

          The refund amount that you will receive is determined by a number of different factors including your income, how many dependents you will be claiming, deductions and credits that are available to you, etc. Generally speaking, the higher amount of allowances you claim, the less income is withheld from each of your paychecks to cover taxes owed to the IRS. Claiming a high amount of allowances will result in less of a refund since less was withheld for taxes over the year. The less allowances you claim, the more is withheld from your paychecks to cover taxes that you are liable for. This typically results in a higher refund (or less tax due after filing).

          If your 2015 tax situation was similar to 2014, I suggest checking out our free tax calculator to get an estimate of what your tax refund will be based on more specific information that you have not provided above. Keep in mind that this will not be completely accurate since it is not yet the 2015 version of our calculator.

          • Celine says:

            I have 1 child he is in pre school and my husband is not working and I claimed 2 in my W4. Do you think I can have a refund ?
            Thank you

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Celine,

            You may be eligible for a refund this year. This is dependent on a few other factors such as your income, filing status, etc. Please take a look at our 2015 tax calculator. All you need to do once you are on our website is begin answering the questions and you will be able to see your refund amount increase or decrease with each piece of information you enter. This is 100% free to try and we will not require you to enter any personal information. If you like what you see, feel free to create an account and begin entering your tax information. We are currently accepting tax returns and your return will be one of the first in line once the IRS begins e-filing on January 19th.

          • Jhada says:

            Hi, I am a server making money from tipped wages and I am claiming single . I only work one job tak care of myself and no one can claim me as dependent. However, if I choose two will I still owe more money at the end of the year? Or should I claim 1 to avoid this issue? Also I’ve always claimed 0 and although I get no less than 2,000 back becaue I am a student I still end up owing at least 1500 to IRS

          • Generally the lower your W-4 exemptions, the more tax is withheld. We wouldn’t be able to answer your question about why you still owe without looking at your tax returns.

      • Norma says:

        Hello, I claim head of household with one income one dependant. I was wondering since I claimed exempt 10 times in between Jan 2016- Sept 2016 will I have to pay back taxes?

  3. Naomi Cabrera says:

    I am head of household, single mom with 2 kids? I want a decent pay and a decent refund at the end of the year? What is my best route?

    Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Naomi,
      Basically, the higher number of allowances you claim on your W-4, means less tax withheld from your paycheck. The lower number you claim means more tax is withheld from your paycheck but you’ll receive a larger tax refund when filing your taxes. In your case, I would suggest claiming 3.

  4. ravi says:

    I am married, Head of household with 2 dependent child and spouse( spouse not working) What allowance should I claim to get the least amount of taxes taken out of my paycheck? I’m not concerned with the refund just want a bigger paycheck.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Ravi,
      I would suggest claiming 4 on your W-4.

      • sade says:

        My husband claims head of household and both my daughter and i as a dependent. I just started working. What allowances should I claim on my w-4?

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Sade,

          The amount that you claim will depend if your husband will continue to claim you as a dependent. If he does, then I suggest that you claim zero on your W-4. If he does not continue to claim you, then I suggest claiming one (for yourself) on your W-4. I also suggest that he continue to claim your daughter.

  5. paulina says:

    i am single and head of household i have 6 children what allowance should i claim to get the least taken out of my check i want a bigger paycheck

  6. Samantha DIaz says:

    Question:

    I just had a baby in January and recently started a new job. I always get confused when filling out the W-2 forms.

    I live with my boyfriend but we are not married. I dont know how many to claim. Help!!

    Recap … Single, one child, not head of house.

    Thank you.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Samantha,
      If you will be claiming your child on your tax return, you can change your W2 to one or two. IF your boyfriend is claiming your child, I would suggest claiming 0 or 1. The lower the number means a higher chance at receiving a tax refund but more tax will be withheld from you pay.

  7. Nae says:

    I am married spouse works seasonally and we have two chidren what should i claim and how should i put that on the w4 form?

  8. Sylvia says:

    We file married joint.
    We are both working.
    We have 2 children.
    I file 4 on mine but am confused by the Child Tax Credit on the worksheet (letter G) and am wondering if I’m supposed should file 2 more (total of 6)?
    Thanks,

  9. Rafael says:

    i am 16 years old and about to get my first job, should my dad put me a as dependent, considering that we are a family of 5 and my dad is the only one working and his head of house hold and my mom dosent work.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Rafael,

      Your dad is still able to claim you as a dependent as long as:
      1. you lived with him for the entire tax year
      2. he supported 50% of your living expenses (ie: food, house, etc…)
      3. your gross income is less than $3,900

      • Bryan richardson says:

        Hi I have claimed 5 on my w-4 and have noticed my employer has not taken out any federal tax on my check will this hurt me come tax return

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Bryan,

          This could definitely translate to you owing the IRS at the end of the year.

          The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

          I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  10. Lady T says:

    I was just wanting to know since I am single with one dependent what should I put for total allowances for my federal tax and what should I put for my total allowances for my state taxes? I ask what I would want to put for each one and I was just needing some advise.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Lady T,

      You are able to claim 2 allowances on both your federal and state. Keep in mind that the more allowances you claim, the less money that is withheld from each paycheck (meaning a smaller refund at the end of the tax year or a higher chance of owing money).

      • JS says:

        Hello,

        I just got a new job in a New city, I am an international working in the US, single and with no kids. I have filled a W-4 and done all my taxes for the past 4 years but I was employed and had an athletic Scholarship at my college, which they also helped with my tax filling. Which is your beat suggestion to proceed w my allowances as my new company is asking me how many allownces do I file on my W4 without chance of getting into any financial trouble in the future.

        Thanks!

        JS

        • JS says:

          I also used to live in GA for the past years and just moved for this new job in FL. How should I proceed about my taxes in GA, FL, and federal?

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi JS,

            If you resided in a state for only part of the tax year, you would file a part-year resident return for that state (the state you moved to and the state you moved from) along with your federal tax return.

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi JS,

          I would suggest claiming one on your W-4 as single with no dependents and one source of income.

          • Hong says:

            Hi,

            Im not sure how to file my tax, recently just got a new job.
            I am married, head of the household, and supporting both my parents.
            What do you suggest I file, I rather have a bigger paycheck and not much on refund.

            Thank you!! Hong

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Hong,

            The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability or refund, at the end of the year, be as close to zero as possible.

            In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  11. Justin says:

    I am not married but will be in October. I have one child with her and 2 jobs. One is full time and one is only 8 hours a week. She does not work. I would like to keep my check decent but also have a good tax return. How many state and how many federal. I think at my main job I have 2 and 2 and my part time job I claim 0.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Justin,

      Congratulations on the engagement!

      With any life change that could have a financial effect on you (ie: marriage, a new baby, etc.), I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It will only take a few minutes to complete and provides you with the most appropriate number of allowances to claim based on the answers to the questions that they ask.

      Keep in mind that the more allowances you claim, the more you will see each paycheck because less is being withheld each pay period. However, the less you will see as a refund at the end of the tax year (with the possible chance of owing as well).

  12. Anthony says:

    Hi, I am head of household, I have a child that lives with me, I also have a girlfriend that lives with me who doesn’t work and also her child lives with us and the father does not pay child support. My girlfriend and I just had another baby together so I’m trying to re-calculate my w-4.

    I make $62,500 per year, last year based on my income and following the Personal allowances worksheet I came up with 7, it would have been more but I did not claim her son last year.

    This year with the addition of the new baby and claiming all 3 kids the form says I should put 11 allowances.

    I do not want to give them any more than I have to but I also do not want to owe them any more money either.

    11 Seems really high, 7 does too but I am following the allowances worksheet as it reads so I want to know if this seems accurate.

    Please advice, thank you.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Anthony,

      The amount of allowances that you claim is based on several factors. You will first need to determine the people that live with you that can be counted as dependents based on rules provided by the IRS. Then you may also want to see if you are eligible for the child tax credit.

      With any life change (ie: marriage, a new baby, etc.), I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will provide you with the most appropriate number of allowances to claim based on the answers to the specific questions asked in the application.

  13. shannon says:

    Hi,
    I am just starting a new job after 9 years. I am single, no dependents. Line A of my new W4 asks you to claim 1 if nobody else can claim you. Nobody else claims me obviously, but can I put zero, I always ‘claim zero’ for my taxes because I don’t ever want to owe money at tax time and want a refund. Should I be claiming 1 here like it says, or do I fill in zero?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Yes, you can enter zero. By entering zero you are more likely to receive a larger refund.

      • Tracy says:

        I am the same status as Shannon single with no dependents but I would like to claim 1 to get more money on each pay check but I dont want to owe too much at the end of the year either. What do you suggest?

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Tracy,

          As a single person with one form of income, I always suggest claiming one. This will generally allow for less to be withheld from each paycheck while still not having to owe the IRS after filing.

          • Amber says:

            I am single, living with my parents so they can claim me as a dependent. Should I claim 1 for Michigan and 0 for federal or 0 for both? This stuff always confuses me as I have just started a new job.

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Amber,

            I suggest claiming zero on both since your parents are still claiming you on their taxes.

            The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      • Anissa says:

        As shannon’s situation above, I am also single, no dependents – if I choose to claim 1, does that mean I will owe at the end? Or more than likely I won’t and will still get a refund just it won’t be as big right?

        • Anissa says:

          Also #5 near the end asks “total number of allowances I am claiming from line H, But line H says to add and I claimed 1 in three different spots so H equals 3, but I’m confused as to which number I put in 5….is it 1 since i claimed only me or is it 3 since that’s what i added up to be?? so confusing!!! 🙁

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Anissa,

            The top portion of your W-4 form is just a worksheet to work out your exemptions on paper. You do not need to provide this worksheet to your employer or even fill it out.

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Anissa,

          I always suggest claiming one as single with one job. You will most likely still receive a refund and not owe the IRS.

          • Lynette says:

            I just got a new job. And so now, I have 2 jobs. I am not head of household. Single. 1 child. Question 1: How can i fill this thing out to get the best out of my taxes?
            Question 2: Am I allowed to claim my child at both jobs?

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Lynette,

            Congratulations on the new job!

            When completing your W-4 form, the more allowances you claim, the less of your pay is withheld while the less allowances you claim, the more is withheld. You are issued a refund if too much was withheld and end up owing the IRS if too little was withheld. Although the total tax you pay remains the same, the amount of allowances you claim determines when you pay it; throughout the year via withholding or in a lump sum after filing your return. Since you have two jobs and are most likely eligible to claim head of household, I would advise that you use the Personal Allowances Worksheet on page 1 of the W-4 and also the Multiple Jobs Worksheet on page 2. Keep in mind that even if you will be filing your tax return as Head of Household, you will still claim Single on your W-4 form.

            It is not suggested that you claim an allowance for your dependent on both W-4 forms. Typically, taxpayers with multiple jobs will claim the majority or all of their allowances on their primary/higher-earning job. This tends to be most beneficial tax-wise.

      • chrissy says:

        I have 2 kids and i always have claimed single 0 but now working i dont know what to claim now that i have kiddos. Should i claim single 0 to get a bigger refund next tax season

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Chrissy,

          You could still claim zero and receive a larger refund when filing taxes.

          The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

          In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  14. Liliana says:

    Im single and have 2 dependents what should i claim? On my recent paycheck it said i was claiming 4 in federal and 3 in state is that right?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Liliana,
      That’s fine. Although, I would suggest changing your federal to 3 as well, that way you are more likely to receive a tax refund when filing your taxes.

  15. Tammy says:

    I got married in april 2014 whats the best way to file on w2 ? i claim 0 dependants husband 1 dependant and husband will be head of household at tax time

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Tammy,

      Congratulations on the new marriage!

      With any new change that financially affects you (ie: marriage, a new baby, etc.), I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. This will only take a few minutes and will provide you with the most appropriate number of allowances to claim based on the answers to the specific questions they ask you.

  16. Avinash Kunigal Nagabhushan says:

    Hi,

    I am married and have one fulltime job my wife doesn’t work, I am just confused between number of allowances from 2 and 3, can you please suggest me whether to claim 2 Allowances or 3?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Avinash,

      The ideal goal at the end of the tax year is to have a small refund or a small amount that you owe. Choosing the correct amount of allowances will help you to achieve this goal.

      The more allowances you claim, the more money you will see in each paycheck. However, the less of a refund you will see at the end of the tax year (possibly with the chance of owing money). If you claim three allowances, you will have less money withheld from each paycheck so the amount will be higher than if you claimed two allowances. However, by claiming three allowances, you will receive less of a refund (or owe more money at the end of the tax year) than if you claimed two allowances.

  17. Casey says:

    I was on unemployment last year and file taxes, owing zero with a decent refund, This year I am working and cannot figure out if I check exempt (no tax liability) on my W-4 or leave it as zero or claim something. I have one child and am a single head of household. I am in NY, btw.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      You can claim two allowances. However, since you may be eligible for the child tax credit and you are claiming head of household, I suggest referring to the IRS Withholding Calculator.

      • Elly says:

        I am in a similar situation. Single mom with one child, head of household, received unemployment for about 4 months (tax was deducted) and at some point things got really bad so I started receiving food stamps as well. How should I file my W-4 and G-4 (State Tax Form for GA). I just got hired for a great position that will pay really great but since I am buried in debt I will need to receive a decent paycheck without owing taxes at the end. Please, advise WHICH claims I should check. Telling me just the number of claims confuses me as I do not know which ones are better to be claimed. Also, I really don’t get the exempt part. I haven’t owed federal taxes. I owed a $18 state taxes but I paid that.

        • Elly says:

          Oh, if it matters, I was unemployed the whole 2014 with my only income the unemployment until April and a $600 child support.

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Elly,

          The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

          In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  18. Matt says:

    I am married my wife does not work. I have 2 kids. I claim zero now they take a ton of taxes out my check and i recieve a large refund. I would like to have a little less taxes taken out but still recieve a fairly descent refund. How many should i claim?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Matt,

      Keep in mind that by claiming zero allowances, you are having the maximum amount withheld from each paycheck. This is also why you are receiving such a large refund as well. I would suggest claiming one or two allowances so that you will receive a slightly larger amount each paycheck and a slightly smaller refund.

      Another place to refer to is the IRS Withholding Calculator. This will have you answer several questions and based on the information you enter, will provide you with the best scenario for your situation.

  19. Brandon says:

    Hi! Nice to see you are replying to these posts.

    I’m married and both myself and my wife work. We have two children but expect to collectively make $170,000. How many allowances should we each claim? Does it matter how you allocate the allowances? I would assume not but just curious.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Brandon,

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. This will only take a few minutes to complete. They ask you several specific questions that will provide you with the most appropriate number of allowances you should claim.

      Keep in mind that the more allowances you claim, the more money you will see with each paycheck. However the less of a refund you will see at the end of the tax year (possibly with the chance of owing money).

  20. Katherine says:

    Hi I currently have a temporary job and feel like they are taking too much in federal and state taxes. I am single and just have this one temporary job that will end in a week or two . I currently have claimed one allowance if I put 2 allowances will it affect me?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Katherine,

      You can technically ask your employer to update your allowances at any time. Keep in mind that this change will only affect your withheld amount from the time you change it and on. It will not apply to paychecks prior to that update. Also, the more allowances you claim, the more money you will see in each paycheck. However, the more allowances you claim, the less of a refund you will receive at the end of the tax year (which may also increase your chance of even owing money).

  21. Reggie Smith says:

    Ok I’m Head of Household , married with a 8 year old son and one on the way, how many exempt should I claim? And will it affect my taxes?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Reggie,

      With your specific circumstances, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. This will help you best choose the amount of allowances to claim. It will only take a few minutes to complete the several questions they ask you.

      Keep in mind that the more allowances you claim, the more money you will see each paycheck. However, the less of a refund you will receive at the end of the tax year (possibly with the chance of owing money).

  22. Jaime says:

    I’m single and claim 0 allowances on my W-4. Last month, my company imposed mandatory overtime for the summer months. Most of the other single employees in my division, changed their allowances from 0 to 10 for this period, with the intention of changing them back to 0 in August. Is this a good idea?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jaime,

      The reason why they are doing this is because the more allowances that you claim, the less money that is withheld from each paycheck and the less of a refund at the end of the year (possibly with a chance of owing money). In other words, your co-workers are ensuring themselves to receive the most out of each paycheck throughout the summer. However it is a drastic change and may not ensure that you won’t owe money at the end of the tax year.

  23. Rose says:

    I am single, head of household, have one child and care for my dependent senior mother. What should my allowance be?

  24. Mark says:

    I am newly married and debating on what I need to choose for taxes. I want the most back at the end of the year what should I choose?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Mark,

      Congratulations on the new marriage!

      The amount of allowances to claim will depend on your filing status as well as you significant other’s and also if your significant other is employed or not. With any new life change (ie: marriage, a new baby, etc.), I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. This application will only take a few minutes and will help you choose the appropriate amount of allowances to claim based on your specific situation.

      Keep in mind that the more allowances you claim, the more money you will see each paycheck. However, the smaller your refund will be at the end of the tax year (with possibly the chance of owing money).

  25. Allison says:

    Hi, I just recently got married and I was wondering if I should claim two on my taxes. Enter 1 for myself under line A and 1 under line C for my spouse? We are both working part time jobs. What should I claim? Also, I am pregnant and due in 1 month. Do I have to wait until the baby is born before I can enter 1 for a dependent under line D?

  26. adam says:

    My wife and i both work, make about the same about of money and have 2 young kids. I claimed zero years ago when I started working fulltime, she was 1, now she changed hers to 2, should I claim 1 or 2? can we both claim the kids as a dependant or does it add both claims since we file jointly?

  27. Melanie says:

    I am single with one job and no dependents. I want more money in my paycheck but don’t want to owe a huge amount at tax time. Any suggestions as to how many allowances to with hold.

    Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Melanie,

      Keep in mind that the more allowances that you claim, the more money will be in each paycheck and the smaller your refund will be at the end of the tax year. This being said, you can either claim 0 or 1 in your situation. If you claim 0, you will have the maximum amount withheld each paycheck yet a higher refund. If you claim 1, you will have a higher paycheck than if you claimed 0 yet a smaller refund.

      • Al says:

        I’m in the same situation, but was wondering if it would be worth me claiming 2 allowances? I got about $950 back on my refund last year, but would rather have that money in my paycheck a and possibly owe a small a amount at tax time. Would this be the way to go?

  28. v jenkinson says:

    My husband and I are filing chapter 13 and it was advised by our attorney to increase our exemptions on our pay to decrease what refund we may recieve at the end of the year so it isnt taken from us as repayment to debt. We are married filing joint, I claim two kids every year and my husband alternates claiming 1 or 2 children a year(arrangement from previous marriage) with next tax year 2014 he will be claiming 1 child. What is the most we should each claim on our payroll without having to worry about oweing anything back later? We do own a home.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi V Jenkinson,

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim so that you reach that break-even point where you won’t have too large of a refund or amount owed at the end of the tax year.

  29. Kasey says:

    I am married & we both work, Also I have one child. What should I choose?

  30. Susette says:

    I am married and have 2 children. One child just turned 18. My husband files head of household. If we want more money during the year but DO NOT want to pay at time of Income Tax season how many should we each file??

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Susette,

      For your situation, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. This will help you to make the best decision since you have a number of factors to take into consideration.

      Keep in mind that the more allowances that you claim, the more you will see each paycheck. However, with more allowances, your end-of-year refund decreases (also increasing your chances of owing money).

  31. Sharon says:

    Hello,

    I am single, no minor dependents. I always owe and this is after claiming 2 all year. I do not want to owe, nor do I want a refund. I pretty much would like to simply break even.

    Would you suggest claiming 1 moving forward?

    I feel as if I have never been able to get this right…

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sharon,

      Keep in mind that the more allowances you claim, the more each paycheck will be, however the smaller your refund will be (or in some cases, you may even owe money). In your situation, with being single and having no dependents, I would suggest claiming 0 or 1. This will give you a bit of a smaller amount each paycheck but less of a chance of owing money to the government (or even a refund!).

  32. Brett says:

    Question about claiming. My wife and I are expecting our first child in October. We get significant money back on on taxes, 10k, and she will be staying home after our little girl arrives. I’d like some advice on claiming to get more money on our paycheck instead of donating it interest free until February, BAsed on what I gather, claiming “3” is our best bet. Thoughts?

    Thanks in advance!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Brett,

      Congratulations on the new addition!

      That is correct – claiming three allowances would have you receive more money each paycheck than if you were to claim one or two allowances.

      Keep in mind that the more allowances you claim, the more money you will see each paycheck but the less of a refund you will see at the end of the tax year.

  33. Chris says:

    My son is 17. I will claim him on my taxes. He will make about $4500.00 this year with his part time job. How many exemptions should he claim on his Minnesota W-4?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Chris,

      Your son should claim zero allowances on his W-4. Another great reference is the IRS Withholding Calculator. After answering several specific questions, it will provide you with the number of allowances to claim that will be most beneficial to your situation.

      • alan says:

        I dont get it. My daughter is in the same situation, so shouldnt she put in the highest number of allowances so no taxes are taken out? yet, your answer to Chris is to use the number zero?

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Alan,

          By claiming a high number of allowances, you are increasing your risk of owing the IRS upon filing. By claiming zero allowances, the maximum amount will be withheld from each paycheck but if too much was withheld throughout the year, a refund will be issued.

          • karen says:

            Hi,
            Same situation, 16 yr old daughter with 1st job, we claim her as a dependent. She lives with us and we pay her expenses. But if she wants less taxes taken out of her paycheck, is it ok for her to claim several allowances? I mean, is it legal since we already claim her?

            And thank you

          • Tax Advisor says:

            Hi Karen,

            Congratulations to your daughter on her first job! You have the right idea. However, she may be making too little to have taxes withheld at all. Take a look with her next time she receives a pay stub. It will show which states, if any, are withholding taxes. If no taxes are being withheld, then she won’t even need to claim any allowances. On the other hand, if taxes are being withheld, then she can increase the amount of allowances being withheld as she sees necessary.

  34. Jake says:

    I just started a new job in the civilian world so this is all kind of new to me. I am single with no dependents, and was wanting some advice on what would be the best for me to claim. As of right now I am claiming 1 in federal and 1 in state. I want the most out of my paycheck but don’t want to owe any money either. what would be the best for me?

  35. Natasha says:

    I am married and pregnant. We currently have one child. My husband (who makes half of what I make) claims 2 on his W4 and married. I claim single with 0 dependents. Is it possible I can claim married and 1 dependent once we have our second child? Should I claim both dependents because I make more?

  36. matty says:

    I’m a single college student and I just got a great summer job. My mom files me under her taxes as dependent. This year with this summer job and my part time regular job I should earn around 13,000. How many allowances can I claim? I want to get more money back in my paycheck but I do not know if this will affect my mom’s tax return she will file next year. I know I have to file taxes as well since I exceed the amount that allows exemption from filing.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Matty,

      Congratulations on the new job!

      If you are single and work more than one job, you can claim one allowance at each job or two allowances at one job and zero at the other.

  37. whitney says:

    I am Married and have 1 child. How should I file? What should my husband file? I want more money but also don’t want to owe any money at the end

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Whitney,

      You should claim three allowances. However, does your husband work also? I would refer to the IRS Withholding Calculator. This is a great tool that will ask you several specific questions that will provide you with the number of allowances to claim that will be most beneficial to your specific situation.

  38. dave says:

    My wife and I both work and each claim married and 1. We have 1 child as well. What it the best option for us both to claim so that we don’t owe and the end of the year?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Dave,

      I suggest using the IRS Withholding Calculator. It will give you the most accurate amount of allowances so that you do not owe or get back too much at the end of the tax year.

      Keep in mind that the more allowances you claim, the more money you will see in each paycheck. However the less of a refund you will see at the end of the tax year (also with the chance of owing money).

  39. Jason says:

    I have 3 kids and was divorced a couple of years ago and by decree, we split who gets to claim who every other year. For example, for 2013, I claimed 2 kids and she claimed 1. Now for 2014 I will claim 1 and she claims 2. I am now recently married. We both work full time and we get to claim 1 child for 2014. I would rather pay out more and get some back then not pay enough and have to owe. What is your best advise on how many to claim?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jason,

      The more allowances you claim, the more money you will see each paycheck because less is being withheld. However, the more allowances you claim, the lower your refund will be or the higher your chance of owing at the end of the tax year will be. I would suggest claiming the lowest amount of allowances possible in order to lessen your chances of owing money. I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator as a second point of reference. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most appropriate amount of allowances to claim based on the specific answers your provide.

  40. Dan says:

    I am married with 6 kids. I am the only one employed. Should I be claiming 9 on my w4?

  41. Larry says:

    Our daughter, age 14, is a full time student in HS and about to begin her first part time job. On the 2014 W-4 worksheet, I know she can’t enter “1” for item A, as we will claim her again as a dependent on our joint 2014 return. Can she claim “1” on question B, since she is single and will only this one part time job? I don’t think she can be exempt as we have a custodial account in her name in which there was unearned income last year (capital gains distribution) in excess of $1,000. Thanks.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Larry,

      As a student with no dependents and her parents being able to claim her, I suggest that she claims zero allowances.

      Also, take a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator as another reference point. This will only take a few minutes to complete and will give her the most accurate amount of allowances to claim based on her circumstances.

  42. Sarah says:

    I got divorced in 2013, and my ex-husband has primary residential custody of both our children (they live with me on weekends and vacations.) Neither of us pay any child support to each other.

    So I file as single, head of household, but how many allowances should I claim? I used the online IRS Withholding calculator and it recommended I claim 6, but I don’t want to end up paying a lot of taxes at the end of the year! (that happened last year and I had to borrow money to pay.) 🙁

    How many allowances should i claim?

    Thanks.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sarah,

      Keep in mind that the more allowances you claim, the more you will see in each paycheck. However, with more allowances being claimed comes a smaller refund at the end of the tax year (or a higher chance of owing money). This may be the reason that you owed last year. I would decrease the amount of allowances you are claiming so that you do not owe as much at the end of the year.

  43. Sarah says:

    P.S. to my post of a few minutes ago: I was unemployed for a portion of this year and have received $5197.00 in Unemployment benefits to date; $600 in Federal Income tax withheld and $180 State income tax was withheld.

    Thank you.

  44. teri says:

    i am single. if i change my allowance from two to one, will i see much difference take home pay?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Teri,

      You will see a bit of a difference in each paycheck if you adjust the amount of allowances you claim from two to one. The less allowances you claim, the less you will see in each paycheck since more is being withheld. However if you update your allowances from two to one, you will see a higher refund at the end of the tax year.

      • mary gonzalez says:

        I am single and claim two allowances, if I change it to one right now (September) will I see a difference in my tax refund? I worked two jobs before and forgot to change my allowances when I left the other job 2 years ago.

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Mary,

          If you update your W-4 form now to claim one allowance, you will see a slight difference in the amount you end up owing the IRS (or the amount issued in your refund). Claiming a lower amount of allowances allows your employer to have more withheld from your paychecks throughout the year to cover taxes owed to the IRS. The amount will not be dramatically different but you will notice the difference in future years.

  45. alex says:

    I am 16, my legal guardian can claim me, I have never worked before. How would i mark my W-4 form?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Alex,

      Once you begin your first job, you will need to take a look at your income to see if it is high enough to have to file your own tax return. I would take a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator to determine the best way to file. In most cases, someone in your situation would claim 0 allowances on your W4.

  46. nikki says:

    I am married, both my husband and I work, but I am head of household, we have 2 children, I want a big paycheck but not have to pay at tax time. who should claim more my husband or me? what should we each claim

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Nikki,

      Typically, your withholding will be most accurate with the spouse that makes the higher income claiming the most allowances.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator as another point of reference. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim so that you reach that break-even point at the end of the year.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  47. Jessica says:

    I am single (no dependents) and working 2 jobs. One is full time and the other is part time that I only make about $100- $120 a week. I claim 1 at each job, but because the part time job is much less, can I get away with claiming 2 there? When I only had a full time job, I had a nice refund, but thinking if I claim 2 on the part time job, at least for the rest of the year, I will get more for expenses now and maybe a little less in taxes, which is ok. Will this work for me?

  48. Justin says:

    Im single and 32 years old and I have new job and I have side job such as USANA health science. Im not sure what 0,1,2,3,4 should I put.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Justin,

      You can claim one allowance since you are single and working. I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most appropriate amount of allowances to claim based on the answers you provide. Keep in mind, the more allowances you claim, the more you will see in each paycheck and the less of a refund you will receive at the end of the tax year.

  49. Lauren says:

    Hi I am married and both my husband and I work. We have 2 children. How should both of us file? Married or married but withhold at a single rate? Allowances are confusing me . We both usually claim married withhold at a single rate and zero dependents. I feel like we are taxed to death but don’t want to pay a lot come tax time.

    • Lauren says:

      Basically how many allowances should we claim? We want to pretty much break even at tax time. Right now we claim married but withhold at a single rate and zero dependents… Even though we have 2 kids. What should I claim and what should my husband claim? Thanks again:)

      • Tax Advisor says:

        Hi Lauren,

        I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and it will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim based on the answers you provide. The amount of allowances that the calculator gives you is the amount that will result in reaching the “break-even” point.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Lauren,

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the best estimate for how many allowances to claim so that you reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  50. Diana says:

    I’m legally married and have one son and work one job how many do I put on my W4?

  51. Jeff Miller says:

    I just got married. I make $175k a year before bonus and my wife makes $75k. We have no kids. How would you recommend setting up our W4/allowances?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jeff,

      Your withholding will most likely be most accurate when all allowances are claimed on the W-4 for the highest paying job. Also, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator as a second reference point. It only takes several minutes to complete and gives you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim based on the answers that you provide.

  52. lizbeth garcia says:

    im am not married but i live with my boyfriend. We have a daughter together. How many allowances should i claim

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Lizbeth,

      I suggest referring to the IRS Withholding Calculator. This only takes several minutes to complete and will give you the most appropriate amount of allowances to claim based on the answers you provide. Some factors that the amount of allowances you claim depends on is who qualifies as your dependent, who is employed/unemployed in your household, etc.

      • dawn says:

        I ADDED UP THE LINES A-H AND GOT A 10.IS THAT OK

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Dawn,

          When finding the amount of allowances you can claim using the instructions your W4, you are calculating the maximum amount you are allowed to claim. Therefore, you can always claim less allowances.

          The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

          I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  53. Dej says:

    I am single,no one else can claim me. I have One child. How many allowances can I claim on my w4.

  54. David says:

    I am head of house hold with two job’s, I’m also single I just don’t know what to claim. I also have a baby before the year is up? Please help…

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi David,

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year based on your current circumstances and the answers you provide.

  55. michelle says:

    Hello,

    I am single, I have no dependents and I rent a room at my cousins house, I do send money to help out my family out of the country, does that count as part of an allowance?. how many allowances should I put on my W4?
    I don’t want too much money withheld from my check but I also don’t want to owe money at the end of the year, Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Michelle,

      You would first need to determine if any family members qualify as dependents for tax purposes.

      I suggest then taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator to help you claim the most accurate amount of allowances to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      • frank m says:

        hey I file married jointly. i have 4 eligible children dependents. my income is 80k annually. how many allowances can i claim and not owe at the end of the year. hopefully a refund. thanks!

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Frank,

          I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim based on the information that you provide. Keep in mind that this tool gives you the amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

          The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  56. kelly says:

    Hey so I normally claim 1 so that I can get more on my paycheck each week and always seem to get a decent refund back from taxes…I can claim 2 even though I’m single with no kids? I always thought it was either 0 or 1…if I did claim 2…if allowed to…would that drastically change the amount of my refund at the end of the year?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kelly,

      Generally, a single person would only claim zero or one allowances. In a case where a single person has two jobs, they will claim two allowances at one job and zero at the other. As a single person with one job and claiming two, you may be faced with owing the IRS money instead of receiving the refund you usually do when all is said and done.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  57. shannon says:

    Hello, i am having a hard time trying to figure out the right amount of allowances i should claim on both federal and state tax
    the last two years i have had to owe and i am not sure why, i think it has something to do with my allowances…i am single with one dependent and will be claiming head of household…i am confused as to whether the higher you go they take out more or less, i would like to have taxes taken out that i wont owe this year and also that it will not hurt my check as much. when i calculated it said 7 allowances…i dont know if thats good or bad or if you have to claim certain allowances if you dont want to but are qualified… i will be claimind dependent care on federal w4…PLEASE HELP IM SO CONFUSED!!! And dont wanna owe for a 3rd year in a row!!!!

    THANK YOU!!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Shannon,

      As a general of how claiming allowances works, the more allowances you claim on your W-4, the more money you will see with each paycheck because there is less money being withheld from each paycheck. Therefore, since there is less money being withheld throughout the tax year, you will have less of a refund at the end of the tax year (or a higher chance of owing).

      Taking your situation into consideration, for example, you are claiming seven allowances. You are seeing bigger paychecks each pay period than if you were to be claiming three or four allowances. There is a smaller amount of taxes being withheld. This could be why you have been owing money for the past couple of years.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator if you haven’t done so already. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to withhold based on your current circumstances.

  58. Kimberly says:

    Hello!
    And I am single. I have no one to claim me. And no one to claim. I work two non full time jobs, With the hours together it would be over 60 hours. I got a new job at the beginning of 2014. Right now I claim 0 on both jobs.
    Recently I just got a raise at work. Instead of seeing my checks increase, the checks I get every other week are less than what my paychecks would be before the raise.
    I want to see more of an increase, because of my raise, but I DON’T want to pay anything when I file my taxes for 2014.
    Why would this happen? And what should I claim on my jobs? I know my options are 0 or 2 from this article. But I am extremely confused over what would be better.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kimberly,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  59. Paul says:

    My 14 year old daughter is going to work at a summer job for about 10 days. She will probably make around $600. She is my dependent. What should she put on her w4 form? 1 allowance or zero allowances??
    Paul

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Paul,

      I would suggest she claims zero allowances on her W-4.

      I suggest also taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator as a second point of reference. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you an accurate amount of allowances for your daughter to claim based on her current circumstances.

  60. amanda says:

    Hi,I have 1 dependant and I work full time. In my w4 form that I filled out at work came up with 6 allowances and no federal taxes are coming out of my check…Will I receive a refund?? What allowances should I file and should I file head of household?? I would rather get more money back during tax time not now

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Amanda,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you an accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point based on the specific information you provide.

  61. Jane Friel says:

    My husband and I got divorced, we share custody of two children. I do not work, he pays support.
    How many should he claim?
    he right now claims married zero because the divorce is not final. We sold our house and really have no deductions. He is getting taxed like crazy.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jane,

      By claiming zero, your spouse is having the highest amount of taxes withheld for each paycheck.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator as a second point of reference. This will only take a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim based on your current circumstances. It will help you to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  62. Randy says:

    I am single, no kids no one can claim me as a dependent . also I have to jobs a part time and a full time. can I claim 2 allowance at my full time and 0 at my part time without having to own money at the end of the year

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Randy,

      You can claim two allowances at one job and zero at the other or claim one allowance at each job.

      Before choosing, I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. This will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim based on your current circumstances. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will help you to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  63. Sarah says:

    I just started a new job after leaving another company after two weeks notice. At this company we are doing our own payroll, I was told I have to claim 0 as a single and no dependent, but I’ve been claiming 1 allowance at my other jobs. Which is the best to use?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sarah,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In your situation, by claiming zero allowances, you will see less money in each paycheck but will have a higher refund come the end of the tax year.

  64. Cheryl says:

    My 18 year old will be a full time college student living at home and working 20 to 25 hours a week. What should he claim on his w4 form. And should he claim “1” on his state form

  65. Cheryl says:

    my 18 year old will be a full time college student living at home and working 20 to 25 hours a week. What should he claim on his W4 form? And should he claim “1” on his Indiana state form?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Cheryl,

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator to determine how many allowances your son/daughter can claim. This only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  66. Nicole says:

    I am married but file Head of Household and I have 2 child dependents, 1 that I pay daycare fees for. In order for me to get more on my paychecks but still a decent amount of $ on my refund what is my best route for me?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Nicole,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  67. Jennifer says:

    im single head of household working part time have 3 dependants please help me fig out ho many to claim just started the job so i dont know details to use tge calulator please help?!!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jennifer,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      With the information you have provided, you will need to determine if any of your dependents qualify for the child tax credit. This will affect the amount of allowances to claim on your W-4 as well.

  68. Bob says:

    Hi,

    I work, im single ….and i also get food stamps…..what option should i choose?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Bob,

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It will only take a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  69. Winston says:

    I am single, but i have a daughter who lives with her mother, not by court order everytime i get pay, money goes into an account for my daughter in her mom name. What should i cliam on my paystub. I don’t claim her on my taxes since she lives with her mother.

  70. April says:

    Hi,

    I just started a job and i was wondering what i should claim. I am married but want to claim separate. I don’t care if i get a refund but do not want to owe taxes either. What do i do?

  71. fcool says:

    HI,
    I just recently got married. My husband and I have one 19 year old child who works and lives at home full time.
    We both work full time, I dont want to have to pay at the end of the year. What is the best way to file?
    Can I still claim my son? Will that interfere with his taxes.
    He also pays rent, I have to claim that on my taxes as well??

    Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Fcool,

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      Also, have your son take a look at the IRS Filing Requirements. This will help him figure out how to file based on several factors. He will most likely be claiming 0 or 1 allowance on his W4. However, the IRS Withholding Calculator will be another good reference point for him as well.

  72. Sydney says:

    Single mom, two jobs. How do I maximize my tax return? Right now I marked 1 for both jobs for a total of 2.

  73. Sydney says:

    More information:

    Single mom, two jobs. How do I maximize my tax return? Right now I marked 1 for both jobs for a total of 2.

    At one job I have 1 exemption and 0 for state and 0 for my city.

    For my other job: I claimed 1 exemption for my federal and 0 for my state and city.

    I do have childcare expenses. My son goes to daycare.

    Should I change it or leave it as it? In the previous years (I just had my son in January) I always owed because I claimed one exemption at both jobs. If I need to change one job to 0 and the other to just 1 to maximize my return I am ready to do that.

    Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sydney,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  74. Samantha says:

    I have worked the same job for 7 years but just this week I started a second job. I have 2 small children and would like a bigger refund at the end of the year instead of a higher paycheck each week. I’m unsure of what number of allowances to claim. I’m unsure of how many I claim at my first job as well but at the end of the year I always receive a large tax check

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Samantha,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      I suggest checking to see how many allowances you claim on your first job. The reason being is because you can split allowances between both jobs.

  75. ashley says:

    Hi I have had two jobs but now working one I did claim three on both jobs held, now I have one job , I need to claim five to get the most out of check then I was thinking about changing it after I make enough for what I needed then changing it too single and claim zero plus have them take out an extra 20.00 dollars, do you think I would be okay for income tax. Head of house hold two dependents. Was going to leave the allowances at five for a month which is two pay periods.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Ashley,

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year. Once you know the number of allowances to claim to “break-even”, you will be able to calculate how many allowances to claim based on your preference to get the most out of each paycheck.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  76. Courtney says:

    Hello!

    I just got married in June. We have no children or anything to write off (house etc). Is it best for us to both claim married and zero? were both working full time. Thanks a bunch!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Courtney,

      Congratulations!

      Now to answer your question;
      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  77. Janetta says:

    I work as a server and make 2.13 an hour. I have a boyfriend who is disabled and doesn’t work. I also have 2 children. I will be filing single and both my children as dependents. How many should I be claiming on my W4? I don’t care about the tax refund, I just want more from my paychecks.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Janetta,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  78. Ejiy says:

    I’m married. Wife is not working but running a home-based daycare business (a DBA under my registered business). So, I have a registered business and DBA as her daycare.

    We have 3 kids. I walked through the calculator & it’s suggesting I claim 11 allowances. My question is: Do I put “1” because my wife is not working or does her business count as work?
    — I currently have 7 allowances. Thanks.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Ejiy,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      Also, you’re wife is considered to be working if she is earning an income (even if the daycare is registered under you).

  79. Jose Valdivia says:

    Hi I have a question does anyone know if it’s ok for me to claim 9 if it’s just my wife and I and my daughter people say just to claim yourself and your wife and daughter so they say claim 3 but it really doesn’t help that much in every pay check every two week is it ok for me to claim 9?? Or more just tell help with all the bills pretty I’m struggling a lot

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jose,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      The reason people are telling you to not claim nine allowances is because by doing that you will be increasing your likelihood of owing money at the end of the tax year.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  80. Stacey says:

    I’m not sure what to claim either. My fiance and I are planning on getting married in October and we have one child. She was born in 2012 and I’ve been at my job since 2009. I have never refiled a W4. What allowances should I claim in order to pretty much break even come tax time. I definitely do not want to pay in. I make more than my fiance and pay in more taxes, so I usually claim my daughter on my taxes.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  81. TRISHA says:

    NEW JOB Im filing single with one dependent. how many should i claim on my w4? on my check it showed 2 but i dont want to owe at the end of the year. please reply

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Trisha,

      I suggest claiming one or two allowances on your W-4.

      You can also look at the IRS Withholding Calculator as another reference point. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  82. Tabitha Brown says:

    Hi, I am just starting a new job and I want to make sure am not having too much or too little withheld from my check. I am married and I am the only one working. We will file taxes together. Right now my exemption is ‘Married filing joint-1’

    • Tabitha Brown says:

      I would like to have a little bit of a refund but I am more concerned with not having to pay any taxes.

      • Tax Advisor says:

        Hi Tabitha,

        The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

        I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Tabitha,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  83. Anthony S says:

    Im single male 24 living in Illinois making about 42,500 yearly. I just started this job June 30th. What is the correct amount of federal and state exemptions i should be claiming at my job so that they are not taking too much out of my check, but also I am getting a refund check come tax time and not owing money instead. No dependents. Single. One Job.Thanks a bunch!!!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Anthony,

      You can claim either zero or one on your W-4.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  84. Rob says:

    I am single.
    I have 3 children that are with me 50% of the time.
    No money is exchanged between parents.
    How many allowances would you recommend i claim on my W4?
    I like to get/owe nothing at tax time.
    Thank You!

  85. Meagan says:

    I just had a baby in april and I just started a new job. Should i claim 0 or 1 on my allowances? I always get so confused when filling out my W4. I am married also. I just want to make sure that I am not going to have to pay back at the end of the year

  86. Peter Hidalgo says:

    Hello and thanks for replying to posts.
    I am 34 and single. I have an on-call seasonal job that I recently started (May 30, 2014) as well I will be working as a Paid on-call Firefighter later this year. My on-call seasonal job varies week to week as to pay, some weeks I make only a couple hundred dollars or nothing at all and some weeks I make $2,000+. My job is based on emergency incidents (wildfires, natural disasters, etc) so I never know how much I’ll make or how much I will work. I will most likely claim zero as a Paid on-call Firefighter but I am unsure as what to claim on my other on-call job. My last paycheck (2 weeks of work) had 35% taxes taken out because it was calculated on earnings of 100k a year, while I would like to make this annually I will not come close and I am unsure as to how much I will even make. Last year I worked part time and only cleared $3,000 for the entire year as I was a student. Some people at my work claim 5 to 7 allowances and I am unsure as to what I should claim so I don’t owe at the end of the year but also don’t want 35% of my paycheck tied up in taxes. I have referred to the IRS tax withholding calculator but there are too many variables or am I missing something when filling this out. Thank you for your time.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Peter,

      I suggest contacting the IRS directly or possibly speaking with your payroll department about this specific situation. They are familiar with this issue since they have had employees who have needed to complete W4s as seasonal workers.

  87. Kim says:

    HI! I currently claim 4 exemptions but my husband is unemployed but still files as head of household. I would like to get more money in my monthly paycheck. Would claiming 2 do the trick?

    • Kim says:

      PS We have 2 children

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kim,

      Claiming two allowances instead of four will cause the amount you receive in each paycheck to be smaller.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  88. Ben says:

    Hi, I recently purchased a new home. I became eligible for the Mortgage Credit Certificate. I’m trying to revise my W4 to get more take home pay. I’m single with 1 job and no children. I have claimed 2 exemptions on my W4. Are their any more exemptions that I can claim?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Ben,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest sticking with the two allowances. By claiming more than two, you heighten your chances of owing money at the end of the tax year.

  89. Shay says:

    I am a single parent with 1 dependant, 1 job. I have 7 allowances on my W4, how/where can I add more allowances? My 2013 tax refund was $3800, I would much rather get a smaller tax refund ($500-$1k) and have more money to take home from my weekly paychecks.

  90. Tony says:

    Hi,

    My paycheck currently says single 2.
    I recently left my other job and now I am single with only 1 job. I am not claiming any dependents nor am I claimed as one.
    Can I/Should I change my status and to what should I change it to, single 1 or single 0?

    Thank you.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Tony,

      I suggest claiming either zero or one allowance.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  91. William says:

    I am married with one child (15 years old), spouse does not work, I am think i should clam either 2 or 3 allowances. I used the IRS Withholding Calculator and it said to claim 0 allowances plus pay an additional $47 per paycheck. I make in thelow 60s, please advise.

  92. Jondy says:

    Hey-

    So I have full custody of my 12 year old from my first marriage, a 2 year old with my fiance but not yet married. She’s a stay at home mother, I’ve been claiming 4; head of household, 3 dependents. I’d rather take a hit each month in higher taxes rather than pay during tax season so please let me know if I’m doing it wrong and I will change asap.

    Thank you for your time/help.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jondy,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  93. nav says:

    Hello,

    I have a single job and currently on OPT status (non- US national). I am single. I intend more take home pay to repay my educational loans and less/zero refund while claiming refunds at end of fiscal year.

    to do so, can I increase my allowances ? Is there a way to do so?

    thanks in advance.

  94. Sophia says:

    Hi, I am single, with only one job. I think I am head of household because no one claims me as their dependent, but I do share rent costs with roommates. Does that put me at three allowances?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sophia,

      I would suggest claiming one allowance.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  95. kris says:

    I am a single parent and have one dependent child. how many allowances should I claim that would give me a bigger tax refund at the end of the year?

    • kris says:

      by the way, I only have one job and file taxes for myself.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kris,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. I’m not sure how many allowances you are claiming now, however the more allowances you claim, the less of a refund you will receive at the end of the year.

  96. krisa says:

    I am single with two jobs this year but I already quit my first job when I had my other job. I have a 7year old son dependent and I want to get more tax refund by the end of the year. How many should my allowance be?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Krisa,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  97. Khan says:

    Hi,

    I am the head of the household with me , wife and sister. How many allowances should I claim ? Should I claim 3 as even she does not work ?

    Thank You!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Khan,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  98. Chris says:

    I am single 23, starting a new career out of college and still living at home. should I claim 0 or 1? If I claim 1, should I open a bank account or some kind of investment plan and put say $100 into it a month or claim 0 and have more taxes taken out each pay check?
    I’m a saver and good with money. thank you

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Chris,

      I suggest claiming zero or one allowance without having to expect to owe much at all at the end of the tax year. Depending on your preference, by claiming zero allowances, you will see less in each paycheck since the maximum amount will be withheld. By claiming one allowance, you will see a bit more in each paycheck but may have less of a refund at the end of the tax year.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  99. Dorell says:

    Hello,

    I just started a new job. I filled out the W4 and it says:

    If no on can claim u enter 1
    then the second part says “If u are single and have only one job” enter 1

    it then says add lines a-g and on h enter that which = 2

    Now at the bottom of the withholding certificate it says enter total allowances which is 2. Is that right? Doesn’t that mean I would have to owe. I don’t want to owe. So would I change those numbers I also live in NYC and this is the first time I have ever been charged NYC city income tax and NY SUI/SDI tax. What does this all mean?

    Please help and thank you so much in advance.

    • Dorell says:

      I also have an independent production company that me and my two partners file as well but that’s separate in a way. I already did that last year

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Dorell,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      As far as the extra NYC tax, there is a rate schedule that corresponds to it.

  100. Victoria Conway says:

    Hello,My daughter is 18 and still lives at currently but at some point before tax time will be moving into her own placeand also she had a job but no longer works so with being said should I file zero on my w-2 form I just want to make sure that im following all the rules and don’t owe anything to IRS please help me understand.thank you in advance.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Victoria,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      • joe says:

        Hi im filing head of household, payed 50 a week child support with no receipts, but i remember claiming four on my w4. I worked for 3 months and made just around 4000. No kids and not married will i still gey money back?

  101. Peter says:

    Hi. I’m a recent college graduate and just getting my first job and moving out on my own making 50K a year starting next month. I understand that I should put 1 as single in B but A which said if someone can’t claim me as a dependent anymore, put a 1. Technically I’ll be living on my own and parents can’t claim me as dependent anymore so am I supposed to put 1? That would put my total and 2 and that sounds off. And I went to the IRS witholding calculator and it said have 12 allowances. What’s that all about??

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Peter,

      The IRS Withholding Calculator may be having you claim 12 allowances since you begin your employment next month and were unable to enter a withheld amount for so far this year. I suggest claiming one allowance in your current situation.

  102. Karisha says:

    Hello,
    I recently got married this year and my husband and I are expecting our first child in November. I always claimed 0 on my W4. I would always get a refund at the end of the year. Now I am thinking of changing my status to,either 1 or 2. I am worried if I change to either 1 or 2 I will owe taxes at the end of the year. When we do our taxes we plan on filing married but separately. If we file separately will I be able to change my status to either 1 or 2. Oh yea my husband is going to claim our son on his taxes. Which ever works out better for us. Thanks for the help,in advance.

  103. Annie says:

    Hello
    I’m single and I live with my boyfriend for 8 years, (don’t have Job) I support everything. (Rent, Car, Ins, food) I heard I can file single and claim a dependent for other realtationship. Am I eligible to claim as Head of Household? and what’s my total allowances? (except HoH, i enter 1 on A,B,D section on W-4, then total allowances comes 3 is it right?)

  104. Anthony says:

    Hi, i have 3 kids and a working wife. this year I owed a huge amount ($40k) thanks to AMT. I’m likely to have AMT again next year – how many allowances should I claim? zero? Thank you for any advice.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Anthony,

      I suggest claiming a smaller amount of allowances than you did last year. You can also use the IRS Withholding Calculator as another point of reference. This only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim so that you reach a break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  105. hexsneaker says:

    Hi I like your article, it is very helpful. Anyways, I have not worked for the passed 1.5 years. I only went for school. Just like Peter I will be making over 50k a year in one of my job. On my other job I will make roughly 20k. Now the question I have is, do i have to claim 1 or 2 on any of my job. I also put 3.6 on my State tax for both should I put higher or lower?. Last year someone claimed me, but thats the first time since I didnt have any job. This coming year I will be filing on my own.

    I own a house and I pay mortgage to it, but I dont have any other loan than that, cars are paid, and I dont have any student loan. I can not take any of my friends advice since they all have loans and I dont. They told me stuff and Iam seriously confused, if you can pls tell me on details what to do, that would be very nice.

    Please reply. thanks. any information would be appreciated. Oh if it helps I will be filing in a Itemize manner.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi,

      I suggest claiming your allowances on the higher paying place of employment W4. I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  106. Hank says:

    I’m married, I work one job, I make in the mid 30s, my wife does not work, and we have one 4 yo child. What should I claim? I think 2 or 3 but not sure.

    Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

  107. Katie Johnson says:

    HI,

    I recently graduated from college this year and I’m married.My husband does not work at the moment. I only have one job and we have no kids. We are staying at my parents house. how many allowances should I claim? Thank you.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Katie,

      If your husband is your dependent then I suggest claiming you and him with two allowances.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  108. Stephanie says:

    Hello!..im having trouble with this!..my husband is head of household and we have 1 child..i will be starting a new job and dont know what to claim safely so i get a good paycheck but dont have to owe the irs..i care more about having more money in my paychecks than i do at the end of the year..HELP!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Stephanie,

      Assuming that your husband is claiming your child, I suggest that you claim one allowance.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  109. Annette says:

    Hi, I now have two children and am not married. Last year I made $34,500, claimed 2 on my w-4. And this year I took three months off for maternity leave. Now having two dependent’s I don’t know what to claim on my W-4. I now have 2 on the form and it withhold about $400 from my check which is a huge difference for me and my income. I am also worried If I claim more I might have to pay when tax season comes around. How many allowances should I claim? Thank you for any advise.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Annette,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  110. Devon says:

    Hi, I am working part time (20hrs/week) and married w/2 kids. My husband claims us as dependents. I would like to receive more money on my mediocre paychecks. What is the appropriate (or maximum) allowance amount I should/can claim? Thanks!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Devon,

      You can claim yourself with one allowance. Another option is to claim one of your children while your husband claims the other. The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  111. Emma says:

    Hello. I immigrated to the US recently and have just been accepted into my first US job. I am married to my husband who is 30 years old and hasn’t been employed for a number of years nor will he any time soon. His mother claims him as a dependent on her tax returns as he has lived with her forever. We will be filing taxes in 2015 (for the 2014 year) as married filing jointly. I am not claimed as a dependent by his mother, but would him being claimed be a problem at tax time if we want to put two exceptions on my W-4 (1 for nobody claiming -me- as a dependent and 1 for married with a non-working spouse)? Should his mom stop claiming him?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Emma,

      Legally, one dependent cannot be claimed by two people.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  112. Elisa says:

    Hi,
    I recently started a new job. I am single, only have one job and no one can claim me as a dependent. According to the W4 form, in the worksheet, I would have to put a 1 on question A and another 1 in question B, which will give me a total of 2 personal allowances. Is this the best option for me?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Elisa,

      By following the directions on the W4, you are calculating the maximum amount of allowances that you can claim. However, you are allowed to claim fewer. In fact, in many cases, single individuals with one job will typically claim zero or one allowance.

      You can also take a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Elisa,

      By following the directions on the W4, you are calculating the maximum amount of allowances that you can claim. However, you are allowed to claim fewer. In fact, in many cases, single individuals with one job will typically claim zero or one allowance.

      You can also take a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  113. Mike says:

    I started the year off married claiming 1, I’m now divorced as of August and changed my status to single 2.
    I’d like to maximize my take home check. I was just curious if claiming 2 is the right choice. I have only 1 Job with gross income of over 32k a year.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Mike,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  114. Brad says:

    Hello,

    I am marrying very soon (I currently take zero allowances). After the wedding my new bride will not work and she will be giving me a beautiful new step-daughter who will continue to live with us full-time. We have an agreement with the child’s father to alternate taking the child tax credit each year. Am I still allowed to take three allowances for myself, my new bride, and our little girl? Does the child tax credit have any bearing on this?

    Thank you very much,
    Brad

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Brad,

      Congratulations on the new additions!

      You can still claim three allowances without claiming for the child tax credit and as long as your new bride-to-be is considered your dependent for tax purposes.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  115. Samin says:

    I’m married and both myself and my husband work. we do not have Kids. what should I claim and how should I put that on the w4 form?
    Thanks a lot

  116. Tino says:

    Married. No children. Not head of the house hold. Should I put 1 or 0? And theres a question following “Additional amount, if any, you want to withheld from each paycheck: $ □” Should I put 0 in the box?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Tino,

      You can claim zero or one allowance depending on your preference.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      You can enter a zero in box #6 unless you need your employer to withhold more from your paychecks.

  117. Justin says:

    I am Single Heal of house hold, I currently claim zero, I just worked 44 hours of Overtime with my job and for the next 3 or so pay periods I would like the maximum refund back, My payroll dept will allow me to have up to 14 allowances, the IRS calculator recommends 7 what if I decided to do 14 allowances and then just change it back after a few pay periods?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Justin,

      It shouldn’t have MUCH of an effect on your refund/amount you owe at the end of the tax year for only three pay periods.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  118. Tavi says:

    Hi, I am married and have 3 children. How many allowances should I put on w-2?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Tavi,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  119. Sarah says:

    Hi there.

    I have been unemployed for most of 2014 with the exception of one contract job that earned me a total of $850 and I believe I was in the 10% tax bracket which means I only have paid about $85 or so in federal taxes this year. I just secured a job that has a yearly gross salary of $56,000.

    I am single with one job and will be claiming head of household. I have a feeling if I only claim a few allowances I will get a huge refund next year but prefer to get more of that money in my bi-weekly paycheck so that I can use the money towards paying off debt.

    I did the IRS tax calculator online and it said I should claim 8 allowances and that this amount of allowances will yield me a $100 refund, which I find very ideal. Do you think the 8 allowances number seems high for someone who has been essentially unemployed for most of the year and will be earning the equivalent of a $56,000 salary for the remainder of the year?

    I of course don’t want to owe the government anything next year but also want to squeeze out every penny possible now. Thanks in advance for your help!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sarah,

      Claiming eight allowances as a single person with one job does seem a bit high. The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  120. jessica says:

    hi,
    i am single and i have 2 job one full time and one part time and both of my job i want take out the maximum amount of my 2 paycheck for hopefully have refund next year or less to pay

    do i put zero on both?
    thank you

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jessica,

      That is correct. You will claim zero allowances to have the maximum amount withheld.

      • Sanaa says:

        Hi
        I am single and have 2 jobs …. I didn’t know about the taxes process while completing my papers because I am an immigrant and I don’t have an idea about all those papers because it is quite different from I am from . I claimed zero as allowance , but I have high amount that is deducted for taxes . Is there any chance I can do something so they can substrata to few amount from my paycheck ?
        Thank you

  121. Nikki says:

    I am single with one child. Should I be claiming 1 or 2 on my w4? I initially claimed 1 but they took out quite more than i expected in taxes. I just got this job last month so I will only be working 4 months for 2014. Also, would I still be eligible to receive earned income credit?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Nikki,

      You can claim either one or two allowances depending on your specific preference. The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Eligibility Requirements for receiving earned income credit.

  122. joann says:

    I am married with 3 kids my husband claim 1 I just stated working what should I claim we do claim married

  123. Lu says:

    Hi
    I am single and have no dependents. I notice my pay stubs says exemptions/allowances: federal 3, ny 0 and New York cit is 0. Is that correct? Why is there a number 3 on federal? Thanks.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Lu,

      When starting a job, you are asked to complete a W4 with the amount of allowances you will be claiming for the year. When filling this out, you must have claimed three allowances. I would speak with your payroll department if you feel this is a mistake. By law, you are able to update your W4 at anytime throughout your employment with the company to reflect on future pay periods.

  124. Ashley says:

    Hi, I’m filling out a w4 form right now for a job I just started today. I am married and my husband makes way more money than I. We have one child. How should I fill out my w4 form? He filled out his way before we got married so I believe his has 0. Should he change his as well? I’m just so confused with all of this stuff lol thanks in advance for any advice you give

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Ashley,

      It is typically more beneficial for the spouse with the higher income to claim the dependents. Therefore, I would suggest he claim your child. I suggest you claim zero or one allowance depending on your preference. The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  125. Uzziah says:

    What if you have two jobs && are claimed as a dependent on someone else’s tax return, what number should be put in that situation? I put 1 for each job.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Uzziah,

      You have a few different options. You can keep claiming one allowance at each job. You can also claim zero at one job and one allowance at the other. You can also claim zero at both jobs.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  126. Smitty says:

    I am the head of household. My wife and I file jointly, and she has an income. We have 2 small children, for which we spend monthly funds on child care. We are expecting twins in December this year as well.

    1) Should my wife and i claim the same allowances on our individual W-2s?
    2) How many allowances should we each be claiming for this year? And next year?

    thanks!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Smitty,

      It is generally more beneficial for the spouse with the higher income to claim more allowances.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  127. Kara says:

    Hi I recently claimed 3 allowances and was single when I did that (May 2014). I still have it as 3 allowances, but just got married. We both have full time jobs. What should I change it to now? 2?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kara,

      I suggest claiming one allowance.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  128. Susan says:

    I filed highly for a good number of months throughout the year as I had a very high garnishment I had to pay for a while, and needed to claim high to make ends meet. I’m now concerned I will owe thousands when it’s tax time. I’m a single parent BUT, it’s not my year to claim my daughter, so the only allowance I can claim is Head of Household.

    I calculated, and had I claimed a 1 all year long the total amount of taxes I would have paid was $13,440. However, because I varied my tax allowance, the amount I’ll end up paying by year-end is $8362.

    Will I see any relief, or will I owe thousands? What can I do in these final months to catch a break?

  129. Lynn says:

    Hi, I currently have 3 jobs (1 full time, 2 part time). I have no dependents and my total income for all 3 jobs is over $50,000. I would like to ensure that all taxes are paid, with the possibility of a refund. Should I claim 0 allowances on all 3 W-4? I definitely do not want to pay back taxes.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Lynn,

      Claiming zero allowances would definitely be most beneficial to you since you would prefer to not owe money at the end of the tax year.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  130. Gabriel says:

    I am a single teacher making $55,000 a year and I do not see much of an increase from my past employer where I made $15,000 less, claiming zero… The same as I am now. Like I said, I am claiming zero on my paycheck but I just changed that to “1.” Will that make much of a difference, in terms of my paycheck size? If so, would anyone know about how much? Any help would be appreciated greatly!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Gabriel,

      Claiming one allowance as opposed to claiming zero will definitely make a difference. Claiming zero allowances is allowing the maximum amount to be withheld from each of your paychecks.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  131. Sierra says:

    I just recently started a new job and I always get confused with the tax info. I am single not head of household but I have 2 kids. I just want to claim myself on the job and pick up my kids at the end of the year. I received a letter from personnel saying I couldn’t exempt and have allowances. I want a decent paycheck and a nice refund!! I can’t understand how I’m not exempt as well because I have a right to my money and I don’t have penalties. I also have childcare credits to claim. Please help.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sierra,

      You’re pay roll department is correct-you cannot file exempt and also claim allowances. If you want to only claim yourself right now on your W4, I suggest claiming one allowance instead of zero.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      As another reference point, I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  132. Tiana says:

    I am married with no children. My husband claims one (at a full time job) and I claim zero (at a part time job). Last year we owed. My husband just recently got a promotion that came with a sizable raise and I just secured a 2nd part time job, which should be starting in the next month. I used the IRS Withholding Calculator and it said we should have 7 allowances on my husband’s job, 1 allowance on my first job, and 0 on the remaining job. I cannot for the life of me understand why the calculator would tell us to claim 7 on his job! Should we just change all of our allowances to zero? Should we change our W4s to Single rather than Married filing Jointly? We would still file our taxes as married.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Tiana,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest that your husband claim one allowance. I also suggest that you claim one allowance at the higher paying job and zero at the other job. Keep in mind that you are able to update your W4 at any time if you feel that too large of an amount is being withheld from your paycheck.

  133. Rakshita says:

    Hi, I have one kid and my wife doesn’t work. Hence, I have opted for “Married filing Jointly with one spouse working” – with value 2 in W4 form.

    What should I put on Dependent Allowances field. Is it 1 or 2 ?

    Thank you.

  134. Erika says:

    Hi, I am married to my to my wife who just recently got a job 4days ago. We also have a 1 child.

    Im only claiming my self & 1 dependent (my daughter).
    -because on another section it stated (enter number of dependents (other than your spouse or yourself) you will claim on you tax return.

    What should i put on my dependents?

    and for field C (if you are married and have either a working spouse or more than one job field)
    – should i put 0?

    Sh

    We want a good tax return check, but i also want a decent paycheck..

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Erika,

      When following the instructions on your W4, you are calculating the maximum amount of allowances that you can claim. You can always claim less than that. That being said, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  135. Burline says:

    Hi I was wondering I am single with 2 kids a 3yr old and a 2month old I just started working 3days ago I am also the head of my house hold, since I jst started working and text time is right around the Conner I want them to cut more from my pay check so I can get alot back at he end of the year, how much should I claim??

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Burline,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Child Tax Credit website page to see if you are eligible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  136. Denise says:

    My husband and I have been married for 25 years and always filed joint. He owns his own business and I have always worked small jobs so I could stay home when the children were young. Now that the children are in college, I have started my career again. Unfortunately my husbands business shows a loss now, and I have a nice salary with claiming 0 deductions. Would it be better to file married filing separately or continue to file married joint for a better refund?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Denise,

      Filing jointly usually gets you a bigger refund or a lower tax bill, and most married couples file joint returns, but there are certain cases where it might be to your advantage to file separately.

  137. Noelani says:

    I am married with four kids. Husband and I both work full time. How many allowances should I claim? I want a bigger paycheck and still get a good tax refund. Please advise.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Noelani,

      Typically it is more beneficial for the spouse who earns the higher income to claim the majority of deductions.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  138. Michele says:

    I am single and recently just started a new job. I filled out my W-4 and the total comes to 2. Ive never claimed 2 before, always one. Should I change one of the lines to zero where i put a one? I don’t want to have to be owing any money at the end of the year.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Michele,

      When you fill out your W-4 by following the directions on the document, you are calculating the maximum amount of allowances that you can claim. In your case, the maximum amount you can claim is two. This does not mean that you can’t claim less. In fact, I suggest claiming zero or one allowance being that you are single and have one job.

  139. Mike says:

    Hi, My wife and I file jointly and have 3 children and a mortgage. I claim one while she claims zero. With a combined income of approximately $140,000 we barely break even and sometimes owe at the end of the year. My question is, how much less can I expect to take home every two weeks if I change my allowances from one to zero?

    Thanks,

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Mike,

      The size of a withholding allowance depends on the length of your pay period along with the amount of money you earned and is derived from an annual basis amount that is equal to the amount of one personal exemption.

      For example, in 2012 the annual basis was $3,800. To figure the size of a withholding allowance, divide the basis by the number of pay periods. If you were paid weekly in 2012, divide $3,800 by 52 for a withholding allowance of $73.15.

  140. Jennifer says:

    Hello,
    I’m single and head of household. Should I put 2 for my allowance? I don’t really care if I don’t get a large refund at the end of the year, as long as I won’t owe anything when I file. Right now, I have 1 as my allowance, and I think there’s still a lot of withholding being taken out of my paycheck, so if I could put 2 and not owe anything that would be great.

    Please advise.

    Also, for next year, I’ll be claiming my mom as my dependent. If I don’t change my allowance this year, would I be ok putting 2 for the year 2015 and guarantee to not own anything?

    Thanks!

  141. Erik says:

    Hi i was wondering, i was working at a job that i think automatically claimed me at 0 i was working there from the start of the year till about aug then i started my new job and they told me to claim 2 because i have my mom as a dependent cause i pay more then 50% of her bills but i dont want to end up paying taxes when it comes time. what should i claim so i dont have to pay but get a refund.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Erik,

      If you have been claiming zero for most of the tax year, then you should be okay with claiming two allowances. I do not suggest claiming more than that.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  142. Steve says:

    I am the only one working and my girlfriend and my son live with me What do I have to check to claim myself and them both?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Steve,

      Assuming that your girlfriend is an eligible dependent, you can claim her and your son on line D of your W-4(if you are eligible for the child tax credit, you will claim your son on line G). You can claim yourself on line A.

      As a second reference point, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  143. Vladimir says:

    Hello,

    I’m married, both of us working. We have 2 kids, both go to daycare. We’ll make under $119,000 together. Should I claim a 6 on my W4? I’ve normally claimed a 3, but now with an additional child I’ve wondered about that? But I fear of owing at the end? Would I owe?

    Thanks!

  144. Nick says:

    I am starting a wonderful new job after over a year long search. Very excited but wondering what I should claim? I am married, my wife does not work, I have a child and a step child both living in the house.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Nick,

      Congratulations on the new job!

      When it comes to claiming allowances, you may first want to make sure that you can claim both children and your wife as dependents. Once you know this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      Once you know the maximum amount of allowances you can claim, you should know the jist of how allowances work. The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible. You do not have to claim the maximum amount; you can always claim less.

  145. Nichole says:

    Hello,

    I am married and my spouse and I have 1 child together. I file married and 2 allowances and my husband files married- 1 allowance. We ended up owing last year so should I change this to something else?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Nichole,

      What I suggest doing is having the spouse with the higher income claim the majority of the allowances. This generally seems to be the most beneficial so that you will get as close as possible to breaking even at the end of the tax year.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  146. Girish says:

    Hi,

    I am married and have a kid but both of them are in India. I would expect to take them to be in US by January 2015. Please suggest the number of claims I should put. I earlier put the no of claims as 3 considering I would taken them to US by December 2014 but which is unlikely now. Please advice.

    Thanks,
    Girish

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Girish,

      If you are only claiming yourself, then I suggest claiming one allowance. Once your spouse and child are in the United States, you can then claim them on your W4. Keep in mind that you can update your W4 at any point in time. You can claim one for yourself right now but you can update your W4 as soon as next pay period (or whenever your spouse and child come to the U.S.)and it will take effect.

      • Girish says:

        Thanks for your reply. I have one more query about selection of Non resident alien and resident alien. I landed to US on July 1, 2014. So I guess I should select NRA and the marital status as single till i claim for myself. Once my family is here, I can change to RA. Pleas advice if I am wrong in understanding between RA and NRA.

        Your reply is greatly appreciated.

        Thanks,
        Girish

  147. taylor says:

    Hi,
    married, husband works full time, i work part time. 2 children by the end of 2014, so would qualify for 2 child tax credits (correct?).. witholding calculator said for my husband to claim 12 allowances and me to claim 0, and we would still receive a refund. makes no sense. Currently my husband is claiming 2 for CA and 0 for Federal… please help. having another baby soon and need to change. what would you suggest? thank you!

  148. Scott says:

    I am married with one child. My wife and I file married separate. She claims 2 on her form what should I claim on my form. I am not looking for a easy way to get more money but to file correctly. Should I just claim 1 for myself and that’s it?

    • Scott says:

      Or should I claim zero

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Scott,

      I suggest claiming either zero or one allowance. Claiming either should leave you at a break-even point come the end of the tax year.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  149. Curt says:

    Hi, just got married in May and both my wife and I work. She is claiming married-0 exemptions. I am claiming single-1 exemptions. Our combine income is over $150000. Should we keep the exemptions the same?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Curt,

      I suggest that you each claim married with one allowance.

      You can keep claiming as you are. Just keep note that you have a few options. If you both claim married, then the withholding amount from each paycheck will be less than at the single rate. Since your wife is claiming zero allowances, the maximum amount is being withheld from each of her paychecks.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  150. Sam says:

    I am a single parent and started working on june 15 I ONLY HAVE ONE ALLOWANCE i did the IRS WITHHOLDING CALCULATR ABASED ON MY INCOME AND THE FACT THAT I STARTED IN JUNE THE CALCULATION WAS $0 FOR MY ANTICIPATED INCOME TAX WHAT SHOULD I DO??? SHOULD I ADD MORE ALLOWENCES SINCE MY TASX RETURN IS $0???

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sam,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  151. Isis says:

    Hi, I am a single parent with two dependents and 3 jobs (one full time, one part-time, and a temporary backup job, if that makes a difference). I’m not sure how many allowances I should claim.

  152. Qya C. says:

    Hi, I am head of household and I’ve been claiming 2 on my taxes for myself and my daughter. I had my son last year 2013 but I never changed the amount that I’ve been claiming. But I do file for the child tax credit for him. Should I be claiming 3 including him as well? Will that effect the child tax credit or anything else?

    • Qya C. says:

      After reading some of the previous inquiries, it looks like I should have been claiming 3 even before I had my son, so should I be claiming 4 now? I make between 40k and 50k annually. I prefer to have a bigger paycheck but I definitely don’t want to owe money.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Qya,

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  153. justin says:

    Hi, I was wondering how many I can claim while getting the least taken out of my weekly check and lowering my chances of having to pay money back. I’m currently married with one child. We both work currently claim zero on our w4 and then we file jointly and claim 1 child. What should I do?

    Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Justin,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  154. Karen says:

    Hello! I am having trouble trying to figure all of this out. I am married with 1 small child. My husband is active duty army, and i am about to start a part time 20 hour a week job. I have no idea how many allowences i should claim and we have no idea how my husbands is set up. Also i will only be working temporarily until early december. Thank you!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Karen,

      I suggest claiming one or two allowances until your husband is able to get a hold of his pay roll department (you may be able to as his spouse) to see how many allowances he is claiming. Keep in mind that you are able to update your W4 at anytime during employment. All you need to do is speak with your pay roll department and they are required to allow you to submit an updated W4 that will take effect the following pay period.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  155. jess says:

    Hi,

    I am single with 3 small children, I am head of household, and live with my boyfriend and would like to know what to claim on my w4. I tried the iRS Withholding Calculator but it just confused me further.
    I normally claim 0 and claim my children at the end of the year on my taxes…can I claim 1 for myself and not have it affect how much I get on my refund? Or how does that work?

    Thank you in advance for your kind assistance

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jess,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      That being said, you can still claim zero on your W4 and still be able to claim your children on your taxes. Keep in mind that you may want to claim one so that you see a bit more in each paycheck yet will still have a refund or owe a small amount when you file your tax return.

  156. Brian says:

    Help! I just started a new job and i don’t remember this W4 being so hard! I am married, both of us work, and I have three children. But when I start to do the PERSONAL ALLOWANCES WORKSHEET portion of the W4 I get stuck at this point (see below). When I do these goofy instructions it makes my number in G: 6 and H: 9 since I have A: 1, B: 1, C: 0, D: 3, E: 1. Why does this seem wrong and such a high number? HELP please so I don’t get screwed in April and have to pay.

    (G Child Tax Credit (including additional child tax credit). See Pub. 972, Child Tax Credit, for more information.
    • If your total income will be less than $65,000 ($95,000 if married), enter “2” for each eligible child; then less “1” if you
    have three to six eligible children or less “2” if you have seven or more eligible children.
    • If your total income will be between $65,000 and $84,000 ($95,000 and $119,000 if married), enter “1” for each eligible child.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Brian,

      When completing the W4 Form, you are calculating the maximum amount of personal allowances you can claim. However, you can always claim less allowances so that you do not owe when you file at the end of the tax year. Since you and your spouse both work, you can either split allowances or the spouse with the higher income claim the majority of the allowances on their W4. The latter tends to be more financially beneficial to the couple. I suggest claiming no more than five allowances between the two of you.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  157. Fancy says:

    HI. I claim HOH with one child (2 allowances) but I got married July 27, 2014 and am just now getting around to changing this information with my employer. My husband used to file Single. Do I change mine to Married with spouse working and increase my allowances to 3 and he increase to 2 or will that be enough to prevent us from owing?I’d like to get a refund even if a small one.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Fancy,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  158. Rachel says:

    Help, please. My husband has argued with me for over 10 years that it is always the best practice for him to put all zeros on his w-4. We file jointly and have one dependent. I make more money than him and my w-4 is set up as 3 (married, one dependent). Most years, I am the only one working, but he just started a job and gets paid once a month. His first check just came in and wow there is a huge amount kept out. His w-4, as mentioned, is all zeroes.
    I really wish he would stop this nonsense of putting all zeroes on his w-4. He says it helps to ensure that he doesn’t have to pay in at the end of the year and that it acts as kind of like a savings account. He insists he gets the grand majority of the withholdings back when we file taxes. I, however, file our taxes each year. And I must say, this does not seem to be the case. Most of the withheld money is not given back to him. Am I right in asking him to fill it out “correctly? (I’m asking this strictly on the tax level, not trying to win a he said/she said argument or anything) I would love to know what the opinion/advise of a tax professional is on this decade-long debate. lol. I truly hope you respond. Thanks!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Rachel,

      I see where your husband is coming from by claiming zero so that he will be guaranteed a refund at the end of the tax year since this has always occurred in the past. Many people think the exact same thoughts. However, let him know that it does not act as a savings account OR guarantee a refund to everyone and I’ll explain why. For starters, a savings account will collect interest over time whereas the IRS withholding taxes from your paycheck will not. In fact, a good amount of the withheld income is not refunded back. Also, although this tactic has guaranteed your husband a refund in the past, there is always the chance that he will owe money, even if it is a small amount. If he gets stuck in this situation, he will have had the maximum amount of money withheld from each paycheck as well as be faced with the fact that he owes the IRS now too.

      My suggestion is, that since you are the steady income-earner of the household, that you claim the majority of allowances on your W4. This is typically the most financially beneficial to couples filing jointly. I also suggest that your husband claim one allowance on his W4. This will allow him to see a bit more out of each paycheck while still being able to see a refund at the end of the tax year; even if it is smaller than usual.

      He’ll thank you later!

  159. Al says:

    Hi! I am single and claimed zero with one job but work alot at 1 job and get very little back but i dont want so much taken out every check i get. I do want a refund at years end but i dont care if its a small refund, i do need a bigger check though. If I claim 1, will I get a bigger check and a refund?

  160. Sarah says:

    I am single with one job, I didn’t file head of household and I don’t have any dependents. should I put 0,1,2? and what would each number mean as far as getting money back. which option is the best?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sarah,

      I suggest claiming one allowance as single with one job.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  161. Parth says:

    Hello,

    Currently I am single and claiming 1 and I was thinking about changing it to 2. I tried the calculator but i didn’t understand it completely

    I would really appreciate if some one could advice me if changing my claim status to 2 would help or not and what are the chances that I might owe to IRS at the end of the year after changing the status.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Parth,

      I would suggest claiming one as single with one job. However, take a look at a copy of the W-4 form. There may be a situation where claiming two would make sense. For example, are you filing as head of household? This allows for another allowance.

  162. Christine says:

    Hi, I am married, we file jointly, and we both claim 1. I am the head of the house hold regarding income. Can I claim more without owing at the end of the year?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Christine,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  163. dominique says:

    I have two kids and single i claim both on my w-4 but my exemption saying 7 what does that means? Are they taking more out my paycheck or no.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Dominique,

      Based on the information that you have provided, it sounds like your pay roll department has made a mistake with their withholding. I suggest checking with them and possibly updating your W4 form with them (which you can do at anytime throughout employment).

      • Vanessa says:

        I’m also having the same problem.. I’m a single mom with two kids under the age of 17..Recently I found out that on my check it says 7 allowonces and no federal tax was being taking out my check for the past two months.Although my first two paycheck federal tax was being taking out will i have to payback the irs some money for the two months no federal was being taking out? If so what can I do to change this?? Please reply back asap

  164. yesenia says:

    Hello.. I am single and I accidently was claiming 3 for about 6 months if I corrected to 1 will it be a problem

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Yesenia,

      I suggest updating it as soon as possible with your pay roll department and it will take effect for the following pay period. It should not create too much of a problem for your. Just be aware that you may not be receiving much of a refund this year.

  165. Crystal says:

    Hi!

    I am single and have 1 job. Before I have claimed 0 and it seems like way more taxes are coming out of my paycheck than necessary. However, I do not want to be responsible for owing money at tax time. I’d rather get a refund. What would be my best option?

    Thank you 🙂

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Crystal,

      I suggest claiming one as single with one job.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  166. Shanda Simpson says:

    I am single taxes are killing me I get 10.50 a hour 35 hours a week how many can I claim to get less out of my check but not owe taxes at the end of the year?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Shanda,

      I suggest claiming one allowance. If you are claiming one right now, then you can choose to claim two.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  167. RJ Pipp says:

    I am 71, collect SS,and am starting a job part time. My job income in 2015 will be approx 16000 plus SS for total of 32000.

    I have mortgage interest of 12000/annual. Iam single. Also is there a penalty for claiming more exemptions on W4 suchas 4 to lower the tax bite and have more in paycheck?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi RJ,

      The ‘penalty’ would be increasing the likelihood of you owing money to the IRS after filing your taxes.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  168. sarah says:

    please email me back . I was filling out my w4 and I don’t know what to do I’m single two children I don’t know what to put on second line either

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sarah,

      I suggest claiming no more than three allowances.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  169. Nasia says:

    Hello, I have been working at a minimum wage paying job and believe I claimed “0” allowances out of fear of making a mistake. I also just got a second job that pays about a good $3 over minum wage and claimed “0” for the same reasons. This year will be my first year claiming taxes and I am very confused. since I have teo jobs should I change both to 1 allowance? Or should I claim 0 on the higer paying job and 1 or 2 on the minimum wage one? I am looking to get the most out of my checks without oweing any money. So a huge refund check is not necessary, I will accept a decent one, especially if I”‘ getting the most out of my paychecks all year round. Your help would be much appreciated as the IRS calculator isn’t very helpful to me because most jobs here in NY don’t give set hours, but have varying scheduling and hours given every week. Thank you.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Nasia,

      I suggest claiming one allowance at the higher paying job.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  170. Sherry Neal says:

    I just started a new job and would like to make sure I do not want to owe taxes. I am single with 2kids. I am unclear which numbers to put where on the w4. Do I put 0 on lines a through g so the total is zero.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sherry,

      The only line on your W-4 form that your employer will be referring to when it comes to how many allowances you are claiming is line 5 towards the bottom. This line represents the total amount from line H OR from the applicable worksheet on page 2.

      You technically only need to provide your employer with the bottom portion of this form. The top portion (“Personal Allowances Worksheet”) is given for your personal records and can be used to work out on paper how many allowances you are eligible to claim.

  171. Beth says:

    I am single and have 1 dependent and I only work 1 job. Should I claim 1 or 2 on my W-4?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Beth,

      I suggest claiming two with one job and one dependent.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  172. Manuel says:

    Hi, i have only 4 months in USA. Im married and we are both working. I actually don’t understand these w-4. I had a job before and i claim zero now i have another job and i claimed two. My wife works and she claimed zero. Which should be the right choice?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Manuel,

      I suggest that you and your wife each claim one on your W-4 form.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a large number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  173. Juillet says:

    Hi there,

    I am single, head of the household and have two jobs. My full-time job my annual salary is $55k. My part-time job my salary is $4k to $5K. I am claiming two on my full-time job W4. Is this correct, or should I claim 2 on my part-time w4 and 0 on my full-time w4?

  174. Laura V. says:

    Good afternoon,

    I am the head of my household I have two kids my boyfriend lives with me (we are not married) I am the only one with a job so they all depend on me how many exemptions should I claim I do not want to claim a too high number or a low one either something that will keep me in the clear for a good tax refund season

  175. Ahleeyah says:

    Hi I’m single and work two jobs. The w4 for my first job I put 1 allowance and for my second job I put 0. Will I have to pay back at the end of the year or will I get a refund? What should I do to make sure I pay in enough so I won’t have to pay back?

  176. Missy says:

    Hi,
    I have just went back to work after being out about 10 years. I am single, head of household and have 1 part time job, I have 3 children. I followed the directions on the W-4 but it has me with 11 allowances. Now correct me if I am wrong but I think that way to high. I surely do not want to pay taxes when it’s time, I would like to receive a refund. Please help me figure this out.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Missy,

      When following directions on your W-4 form, you are calculating the maximum amount of allowances possible. You can always claim less in order to prevent yourself from owing the IRS at the end of the tax year.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      • Missy says:

        I tried that Withholding Calculator befor, I couldnt fill it all out, wants me to put how much I will make, I really have no idea. I was hoping I had given enough information for you to suggest a good number for me to claim. Thanks for you time though 🙂

  177. Layah says:

    I have 4 children and on my check it says 7 allowances. Also on my check it does not show any federal taxes being taken out. Is this because I have 7 allowances? Will I still receive a income tax and is there any way to change this now since it is so late in the year

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Layah,

      Claiming seven allowances may cause you to owe money at the end of the tax year. You can update your W-4 with your employer at any time and it will take effect the following pay period. I suggest lowering the amount that you are claiming on your W-4 form.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  178. Stephanie says:

    I am single, just had a baby in August so I have one dependent. I would like to know what I should claim to get the most out of my paycheck and tax refund. Also since I am single and now have a dependent would I be able to file head of household as well?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Stephanie,

      I suggest claiming two on your W-4 form.

      Typically, you can claim head of household if you are unmarried and pay more that 50% of the costs of keeping up a home for yourself and your dependent(s) or other qualifying individuals.

  179. laura says:

    if i am a single mother who is head of household with 2 kids and a boyfriend that depend on me i am the only one who has a job so the only income the house recieves is mine how many allowences should i put on a w4 form

  180. christina cervantes says:

    im the head of house hold sinlgle parent with 4 kids i want to get a bigger pay check i only have 2 dependents bwant to know if i shoud add more dependents i want to get back a good amount of tax return

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Christina,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  181. Anne says:

    Hi,

    I am married with no children and we have continued to both fill in our W4s as single, no allowances since marriage but file jointly at tax time. However, we have reached a point where we need to have more money during the year vs. during tax return season. I am the higher earner (I make around 17-20k higher than my husband a year) but I believe we always file with him as head of household. What should we both claim, if anything, to make our take home pay a little better on a weekly basis?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Anne,

      Since you are both currently claiming zero, I suggest that you each update your W4s to claiming one and married. This will allow for a bit more in each paycheck without owing at the end of the year.

  182. Adalberto says:

    I have a new job and on the W4 sheet it’s asking for allowances is that the same as my dependants? When I do taxes I will put my 2 sons who will be 2 years and 5 months then, do I put them and myself as the allowances on the form.I will file as head of household and single because I’m not married but me and my girlfriend live together . or what would I put as my allowances

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Adalberto,

      When looking at a W-4 form, you will notice the Personal Allowances Worksheet in the middle of the first page. This helps you to determine the maximum amount of allowances you can claim. You will notice that for line ‘D’ you are asked to enter how many dependents you will be claiming on your tax return. Also, on line ‘E’, you are asked to enter a ‘1’ if you are claiming Head of Household. You can follow the directions for each line and then record the sum of lines A-G on line H. That amount can then be carried down and recorded on line 5.

      Keep in mind that once you have followed the directions on your W-4 and found the maximum amount of allowances, you can always claim less to make sure that enough is being withheld from each paycheck.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  183. nick says:

    Question-

    I live with my boyfriend, we both work one job each and file taxes seperately. My boss told me to do 3 allowances so i had more coming in my paycheck and figured i should be fine with not owing at the time of taxes. Did i set myself up to owe by listening? I look to earn roughly 30,000 for the year.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Nick,

      If you are filing as single with one job, I would suggest claiming one on your W-4.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      However, take a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  184. Mike says:

    Hi, So I am a single man, I Essentially i wanted to change my dependencies so I receive more up front, but do not end up owing at the end of the year. I am unsure of the number of dependencies and allowances I should put any recommendations?

  185. ms harris says:

    Okay I’m a single mother of 5,I just realized that no federal is being talking out I work at McDonald’s I also pay 240 a month for my daughter whom does not live with me I’m wondering if I will even get a refund back if I do claim tax’s however I filled with 4, dependence I was told that I didn’t make enough and because I pay child support it kinda worked in my favor I just wanna know why is it like that I’m in need of a blessing and don’t wanna be out because of cumstances please help

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Ms. Harris,

      Typically, people have a portion of their paycheck withheld to pay the federal income tax and, in some cases, a state tax as well. After deductions and tax credits are calculated, the amount paid (through withholdings throughout the year) often exceeds the actual amount owed. This results in a tax refund. If you didn’t have any federal taxes withheld from your paycheck you may still get a refund, but there is a chance you could owe taxes to the IRS instead.

  186. Leesa says:

    I am turning 24 in November, but my mom usually claims me on her taxes. I am unsure of what to put on my w4 form when it asks how many allowances I am claiming. Also, I am not married and I have no children.

    • Leesa says:

      Also, I will be working one job.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Leesa,

      I suggest claiming one allowance as single with one job.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  187. kira says:

    Hi, I am a full time student, just got a job at the cafeteria on my campus, what would I put, I’m 19, single, no kids. One of my parents claim me on their taxes (im pretty sure), I really dont want to ask but if they didnt claim me what would I put would it make a difference? thanks in advance.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kira,

      If your parents can claim you, I suggest claiming zero on your W4. If you are claiming yourself, then I suggest claiming one.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  188. Daphney says:

    Hi! I am a married woman with no kids yet. My husband is not yet a legal resident of the States, what number should I claim on my W4 to ensure that the right amount of tax is being taken out of my paycheck to not owe the IRS anything. I want to have the IRS give me $$$ back instead of me owing them.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Daphney,

      I suggest claiming one on your W-4.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  189. Eric Salgado says:

    I currently am the only one working and my girlfriend just gave birth to twin boys, making them child 2 and 3 for us, how many dependants do i claim? Do I include myself?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Eric,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  190. Makadin says:

    Hi ! I’m 17 and I work two jobs. I live with my mother and siblings and give her half my paychecks bi-weekly. What should I put as my W4 at the moment it’s Single and 0. I get a lot taken from my paychecks and would love a bigger check considering I don’t make much anyways! Thanks!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Makadin,

      If you file your own taxes at the end of the year, then I suggest claiming one.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  191. Anthony says:

    Good day. I am divorced and have two kids, however we have a 50/50 time-sharing court order, and I do pay child support as well. What should I be claiming to allow me to receive the max on my paycheck and avoid paying such a high tax bill? Thank you! 🙂

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Anthony,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  192. mcginnin says:

    Not sure if this is still open/giving advise but this page is awesome!

    My wife and I both work and have one child who is in day care. We both claim 0 on federal and state. We have always enjoyed the large refund but things are getting tight what would you suggest? TIA!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Mcginnin,

      Thank you! Yes, blog comments are always welcome and encouraged!

      I suggest your that you and your wife each claim one on your W-4 form. This will allow for a bit more in each paycheck. Also, if you’ve always had a large refund, then you will most likely still receive one (just a bit smaller when claiming one allowance each).

  193. Tay says:

    Hi! I am so confused with the whole tax thing! I am head of household, single with one dependent child and currently pregnant with another who is due in February. What should I claim?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Tay,

      I suggest claiming two as of right now.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  194. Alana says:

    Hello. I am a single mother with one dependent child… On my pay stub it says I am claiming 7 federal and state head of household 0. Is that correct? I’m not so concerned with the income tax refund at the end of the year I just don’t want to owe the IRS anything and I want a bigger paycheck. Please advise. …

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Alana,

      I suggest claiming two allowances. You may want to speak with your pay roll department about updating your W-4 form. From what you have mentioned above, it sounds like you have claimed seven on your W-4 form.

  195. Shane says:

    If 1 spouse is working 1 job only getting about $700 a month, 1 baby, and the other spouse is disabled… is it illegal to claim 0 or 1 even if the calculator says to claim 3?

  196. Alex says:

    Hi. I’m paid monthly. Gross monthly earnings are $4084, federal taxable earnings are $3540. I just looked at one of my pay stubs and realized I’m only having $152 withheld for federal tax and $11 withheld for CA state tax. These figures seem bizarrely low to me.

    I’ve claimed four allowances because I have a spouse and two children. Have the four allowances generated this very low level of withholding?

    My husband also works. I assume we should be splitting the four allowances between us, not both claiming four. So, if I claim four, he claims zero … is that correct?

    But even with him claiming zero, my withholding seems alarmingly low! Advice?

    Thanks for your help.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Alex,

      That is correct. Since you are claiming four on your W-4 form, less is being withheld from each paycheck. Also, you are your spouse should not each be claiming allowances. You can either split them or one spouse claim them all while the other claims none.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      • Alex says:

        Thanks for the advice! I appreciate it. I’m still surprised that four allowances create such a huge reduction in withholding. I think I’ll scale back on allowances.

  197. Paula says:

    Hello I’m married but separated. I’ve always file my taxes as head of household and single I have one child and my mom as a Dependant. What number of allowances should I include in my w-4. I’m also going to start a part time job next week does this have any effect when I’m filing out this form? I need them to take as little money as possible from me so I could get a decent pay check what do you suggest?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Paula,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      When it comes to filling out a W-4 for two separate jobs, it will typically be most beneficial to claim the majority (or all) of your allowances at the higher paying job.

  198. Mike says:

    Hello I’m single, living with girlfriend and have a child. My girlfriend does not work and I’m also filing as head of household. How many allowances should I claim?

  199. jess says:

    Single mom with 1 kid, head of household for a house, full time worker and student. I could use more out of my paycheck but want to make sure I get money at tax time. What should I claim?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jess,

      I suggest claiming one or two on your W-4.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  200. Abby says:

    Hi, I am single, living on my own with one full time job and I am 23 years old. I lived with my mom from January-August 2014 and even though I paid my own bills while living there, she will probably still claim me as a dependent. Therefore, what do I put on page 1 “Allowance for Yourself”, 0 or 1? I don’t want to be claimed since I am not living with her but I don’t know what the technical rules are if I claim I am not a dependent and she does claim me as a dependent.

    Thanks!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Abby,

      No one can claim you as a dependent without that person’s consent. You can claim yourself and if your mom also does, then her return will most likely be rejected.

  201. Mike says:

    I’m a single person and just started my first job of the year . Federal and state taxes weren’t being deducted. I don’t know if I fill it out wrong because I always put 0 . Is this correct? Should I change it to 1?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Mike,

      You may want to speak with your pay roll department. Claiming zero on your W-4 form means that the maximum is being withheld from your paycheck for taxes. It is possible that you aren’t earning enough of an income for them to be withholding from your paycheck but your pay roll department will be able to shed some light on this.

  202. Kay says:

    Not sure what my tax status would be or what Allowances to claim:

    Single Income (Spouse does not work)
    2 children

    Does this mean I am Head of House? Can I claim 4 Allowances?

    Any advice is appreciated!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kay,

      You CAN claim four, however, keep in mind that claiming a higher amount means that less is being withheld from your paycheck. Also, you can generally ONLY claim Head of Household on your tax return if you are unmarried and pay more than 50% of the costs keeping up a home for yourself and your dependents. From what you said above, you only fit one of the criteria.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  203. Laura says:

    I am debating when is the best time to marry and use the tax code to my benefit. My fiance and I together make $70K, working at full time jobs. Would it make any difference in our taxes if we married in December of 2014 rather than in May of 2015? Would our withholding change and would we file married together or married separate? We each claim 1 allowance each now, and usually get some money back.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Laura,

      According to the IRS, if you were married on December 31, you are considered married all year.

      When it comes to filing, I always suggest that spouses file jointly as it is more financially beneficial (unless of course you have a specific reason to file separately).

      I also suggest that you both each claim one on your W-4 forms.

  204. Rebecca says:

    Hi,

    I’m trying to fill out my W4 for new employment and can’t figure out how many allowances I should claim. I am not claimed as a dependent on anyone else’s taxes and I just got married. My husband’s income is about 1500 or less and we aren’t sure if in April of 2015 we should do joint taxes or separately? Someone Please Help!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Rebecca,

      I suggest claiming one and your husband claiming zero or one.

      Also, I always suggest filing jointly unless you are aware of a reason not to. It is almost always more financially beneficial.

  205. Sil says:

    I am a mother of one, can you please tell me what my number of allowances should be on W-4.

    Thanks so much

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sil,

      I suggest claiming one or two on your W-4.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  206. Ravi says:

    I am married with 2 kids and spouse is not working. If I put ‘1’ allowance in the W4, do I get bigger refund when I file my taxes and joint married.

    I am okay with less check for now.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Ravi,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  207. Michael says:

    I am single with no children and not head of household. My salary is $45,000 annually. I claimed 3 allowances without knowing and am 5 months into work.
    Will I owe money?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Michael,

      Whether you owe or not will depend on a few different things. However, you can update your W-4 form with your employer at anytime and it will go into effect for the following pay period. I suggest updating yours and claiming zero for the remainder of the tax year.

  208. Kelsie says:

    I’m a new graduate that just started working a full-time job. My annual salary is $40,000 and my parents say they can’t claim me even though I live at home. I have claimed 2 on my w4 (“1” for line a and “1” for line b), but have been hearing that’s incorrect.

    I’m not sure if I should be entering “1” on lines a&b or not, can you please advise?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kelsie,

      I suggest claiming zero or one on your W-4.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  209. luis says:

    hi , am 19 years old and a father of a 2 year old girl, am not married or single. I am still with my child’s mother and I lived with her and her parents. I am not paying rent yet and my child mother still in school and she not working. plus this going to be my first real job and dealing with taxes. I need help , how many allowance should I put and how much withheld I should be getting. please reply . thank youuuu.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Luis,

      I suggest claiming one or two on your W-4 form. You may want to also check the IRS website for the requirements for claiming a dependent.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  210. John says:

    I am starting a new job after about a month, single with no dependents, not head of household. Should I claim 1 or zero?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi John,

      I suggest claiming one.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  211. Abi says:

    Hi ,I just got married and have no kids yet but my husband has two. What Soni claim on my w4 form pls. He is the head of household.
    Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Abi,

      I suggest that you claim one on your W-4. Your husband will most likely be claiming more on his own since he has two children.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  212. Kathy says:

    I am married and receive two pensions; one pension is $760 per month; what is the maximum tax that can be withheld? If I select Married and zero allowances, how much will be withhold? If I select Married and 1 allowance, how much will be held.
    Thank you!

  213. Ashley howell says:

    My wife works full time and just picked up a job working 4 hours a week on every Saturday and there wanting her to fill out a w-4. What should she claim on this.

  214. Dan Daglia says:

    Just got divorced last Dec… I am claiming 0 on my W 4… I have one job part time. Also still send money to my grown kids in Fl. The are not working. I help with what i can. Not all the time but i do still support with money. Can i claim them as dependents. ?
    Also should i claim on for me as single to get more in my check. ?
    Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Dan,

      I suggest claiming one if you would prefer to see more in each paycheck. By claiming more than one on your W-4, you run the risk of owing the IRS at the end of the tax year.

  215. Scott Peters says:

    Hello sir. Recently divorced and paying alot in alimony and child support. I have always claimed married and one on my w4. Always got a great return and enough money in my checks to live. We have 2 children, and i am allowed to claim one on taxes. My ex claims the other. What should i claim now on my w4, so that i still get a small refund, but still having enough money in my checks each week to live?. Child support and alimony leave me with barely enough to live on now. Thank you sir, for your time.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Scott,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year. It will also take into account the fact that you pay child support and alimony.

  216. Evan says:

    I am single, can claim head of household, and have one dependent. What should I claim on my W-4?

  217. Joseph M. says:

    Hi,I have been at my job now for about 10 months and I claim one,but I also recently had a child with my fiance who also has a child from a previous relationship,I would like to recieve more money in my checks and still have a nice enough tax return as well.I feel like since my fiance makes more money and may be getting a bigger tax return maybe she should claim both childrwn and head of household,or would we both have about the same size return if we claim one each?So I guess what Im asking is how many dependents should i claim for work,and should we each claim a child or one claim both who is also claiming head of household that makes more?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Joseph,

      It is typically more beneficial for the spouse earning the higher income to claim the majority of dependents. I would suggest that you stick with claiming one or two.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  218. Vicki says:

    Hi,

    I am single (divorced) and only 1 of my children still lives at home. Since she works, and is not a full-time student, can I still claim her as a dependent? She works for minimum wage, 20 hours per week and files 0. But, I pay for her health ins, car ins, all food and medical expenses, etc. She will be turning 20 this December.
    Also, I’ve been claiming HOH with 9 exemptions for 12 years and always got a huge refund. Now, my adjustable mortgage interest rate has dropped, and along with it, so has my huge deduction! How many exemptions should I change it to? I do NOT want to owe anything! Thanks!!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Vicki,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  219. Cathy says:

    I am single, with one dependent and I file Head of Household. You suggest filing 3 to be sure that enough but not too much tax is taken out but what lines on the W-4 should I put the numbers on? What should I put for lines A thru H?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Cathy,

      If you take a look at a copy of a W-4 form, you will notice that the top portion is solely a worksheet to work out your allowances. It is for your personal records and is not required to be given to your employer. In fact, you do not even need to enter anything in the top portion since the only part given to your employer is below the dotted line.

  220. justin2246@gmail.com says:

    Hi, I am single no kids. I would like a bigger paycheck. What do I claim if I just want some taxes and I’m willing to pay taxes around tax return time? Thanks!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Justin,

      I suggest claiming one. The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  221. mike says:

    Hi, I started a new job Nov 1 and am paid twice a month. Salary is $70,000. I am married filing joint. My wife works as a sub teacher but she works only from time to time and earns little. I have 2 children ages 14 and 11. I am thinking claiming 3 or 4? Which would be best? thank you.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Mike,

      You could technically claim either three or four on your W-4 form. However, in your case, it would depend on preference.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I also suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  222. Chad says:

    I live with my gf and we just had a baby Nov 8th, my gf is claiming my daughter and we file taxes seperately. I have a full time job but I start a part time job to do while my gf isn’t working on maternity leave. What exactly would I claim on my new work form?

  223. Jay says:

    I’m single and still claimed as a dependent. I have one job with 0 allowances for fed and state, and I started another job about a month ago and put 0 for both as well. I noticed taxes aren’t being withheld for state at my new job. Did I put the wrong number or should I just elect to withhold more? Thanks

    • Jay says:

      Oh and they are both part-time jobs

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jay,

      If you are not making above a certain income amount, the IRS will not withhold taxes. You mentioned in a following comment that both are part-time jobs. This may be why you are not making over a certain amount for each job to withhold taxes. However, since you have not mentioned your income, I cannot be positive so I suggest speaking with each pay roll department to be sure that this has not been done in error.

  224. Alejandro says:

    I’m married, we don’t have kids. I moved from Mexico and my wife will be here around January, she will not be working in US. I want a big paycheck and pay the right amount of taxes. I have been working for almost a month and I think my withholding is too much.

    I get paid bi-weekly $2,692.00 and the federal income tax is 4$92.07. I have been working for almost a month and I think my withholding is too much.

    I’m starting a life here so is it better to pay more taxes over the months and wait for a tax refund or pay less taxes and owe the IRS and pay at the end of the tax year?

    Should I claim more allowances?
    Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Alejandro,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  225. KJ says:

    Hi I am single with a full time job. No dependents. I have always claimed “0” however for the next two months I would like to get more back on my paycheck. 1. Should I claim 2 or 1? And 2. Will this hurt my refund too badly if I do this? Thanks for your help!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi KJ,

      I suggest claiming one when filing single with one job. Claiming two may cause you to owe the IRS after filing taxes so just keep that in mind when updating your W-4 form.

  226. Irena Duringer says:

    i just started a commission only job I claimed exempt but I before I did claim 1 I think I should claim more than one. What do you think I should claim cause commission only isn’t gonna be the same amount every month.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Irena,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  227. Japel says:

    Hello, I am a single male with no dependents. I need help. My first job was this year around may, when I filled out my W4 form I had two exemptions for both state and federal. That job lasted two months. Then my next job started in August and I claimed zero exemptions for both federal and state. That job lasted a month and a half. Will I have to pay back? The first job we got paid every two weeks, the next was every week.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Japel,

      There are several other factors that come into play including your income amount. From what you have stated above, it does not seem as if you will owe the IRS much at all considering that the amount that they have withheld was not over a substantial amount of time to accumulate a large sum.

  228. Kelly says:

    I am a single mom of a 17yo and a 14 yo. I work three jobs. Two of them are part time and do not withhold taxes or social security, and do not offer benefits. My full time job does. I got hit with a huge tax bill last year because I didn’t withhold enough to cover the two jobs’ earnings and don’t want to make that mistake again. I have been withholding 2 from Federal and State, but my paycheck is nearly cut in half every week.

    Am I withholding enough, or too much? I can’t afford another $5k debt to the IRS, and I need to make sure I have enough to feed the kids. Please advise.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kelly,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  229. Nelly says:

    Hey,

    I claimed 4 allowances on my tax refund, I make almost 30,000 annually. I am single, have 1 child, Head of household, and single with job. I would like to have a decent refund. Would I owe a lot of money for my tax refund? Is there any advice you can give me please? How much would I owe? Thank you for your help!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Nelly,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4, you will calculate the maximum amount that you can claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount taken out. If you claim a larger number, you’ll have less taken out. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  230. Jessie says:

    Hello thank you for responding back,
    So my husband works we usually file jointly we have one child what is the correct way to get a bigger refund ? Is there a big difference between filing head of household and filing jointly ? What would you suggest ?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jessie,

      As a married couple, you have two filing options – married filing jointly or married filing separately. It is typically most financially beneficial for spouses to file jointly. Filing jointly allows for more tax credits. There are only a few common reasons why a married couple would file separately (ie: one spouse chooses to itemize their deductions while the other chooses to use the standard deduction).

      As a married couple, filing as head of household is not an option. This filing status is only for single people who have cared for a dependent for more than 50 percent of the year and meet other IRS criteria for this status.

  231. Kim F. says:

    Hi!

    I understand how to determine how many to claim on my W-4, but what I don’t understand is how the married or married at single tax rate plays into it. Here’s my situation: My husband works 1 full time job and every other year we are allowed to take the child tax credit for his son. As of next week, I will be working 2 part time jobs and I’m trying to figure out how to fill out my new W-4. At my current job I claim 1, married at single rate. If I do the same at this new job, will we be in trouble come tax time? We file jointly. Also, we use our tax returns each year to get us through the summer months when my husband’s hours are fewer, so a decent tax return is not a bad thing for us.

    Any advice you could give me would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank You,
    Kim F.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kim,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      When you report single as your filing status, more is withheld from each of your paychecks than if you were to report married. However, you do have the option to have the same amount withheld as if you were single but are reporting that you are married. This option is available by checking the box, “Married, but withhold at higher single rate”.

      Based on what you have stated above, you will most likely have a refund after filing.

  232. Vanessa says:

    Hi,

    I am married and will begin my new job this January 2015. My husband also works and has been at his job for over 3 years. I believe he claims 2 on his tax form. Am I also supposed to claim 2? Or is one person supposed to claim less? Your advice would be greatly appreciated! Thank you!

  233. Heidi says:

    When filling out the personal allowance worksheet line H gives me a 5 for total number of allowances. It then tells me for the employee withholding form to transfer line H for the total number of allowances you are claiming. Do I have to put 5?

    I have always done 0 to get the most taken out and the most back at the end of the year. If I claim 5 I fear I would owe money. I recently had a baby and claim single with 1 child. I am also eligible for the Child Tax Credit which is what is bringing by allowances to 5. I just want to make sure if I put 0 it won’t effect claiming my daughter on my taxes.

    Thank you for any advice!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Heidi,

      By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. This will not effect you claiming your daughter when you file your taxes later in the year.

  234. Andrew G says:

    Hi I am single also head of household I have a daughter but i do not claim her on my taxes I let her mom claim her. I do have expenses with her though about $5000-$8500 a year I work 2 jobs one FT an one PT. What is the best number to claim at both jobs so I can get the most on my check without having to owe anything I really do not care about a refund i rather see more on my check weekly i just do not want to owe anything.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Andrew,

      I would suggest claiming one or two on your W-4.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  235. Monica says:

    Hi,

    I’ve just been hired and is currently filling out a W-4 form for my new employer. I start working at the end of January 2015. However, currently, I am single and unemployed with no children. Am I supposed to claim 1 or 2?

    The W-4 form states:

    Enter “1” for yourself if no one else can claim you as a dependent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A
    B Enter “1” if: {
    • You are single and have only one job; or
    • You are married, have only one job, and your spouse does not work; or . . .
    • Your wages from a second job or your spouse’s wages (or the total of both) are $1,500 or less.}

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Monica,

      When you start your job, I would suggest claiming one as single with one job and no dependents.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  236. Afghan Bro says:

    Hi,

    I’m single and have no dependents, I have claimed 2 in my Federal income tax and 1 in NC state income tax, at W2 form,
    now at the tax filing time, I would have to owe money to Government or I would get refunded?

    I don’t have medical insurance all year 2014, so how would I pay the fine?

    Your answer to my questions would be highly appreciated!Thank you!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Afghan,

      Unfortunately, I am unable to give you an answer whether you will receive a refund or not since it is based on a few other factors including your income amount and what you claimed on your W-4 form.

  237. Mike says:

    Hi,
    I’m married, my wife doesn’t work, and we have two children. Since I’m married and make less than $95,000, I can claim two for each child. This will give me 9. Should I do this, or scale it back?
    Thanks,
    Mike

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Mike,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  238. LA says:

    My husband and I both have jobs, file jointly, and have two children. We don’t want a refund, and want the least amount taken out of our checks. How many should we claim?

    Thank you!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi LA,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  239. kim kay says:

    HELP! Too much money comes out of both of our checks. We need to change W-4s this week.
    My husband and I both work and we have two kids. What should he claim? Me?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Kim,

      I suggest increasing the amount you claim on your W-4. Also, it is typically most beneficial for the spouse earning the higher income to claim the majority of allowances.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  240. jose says:

    I use to claim myself but wanted to add a dependent n change my w-4 cause my work taking to much money on taxes.. im head of household , single, can I add myself also? Can I put 4 in total without being penalized at the end of year?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jose,

      You can claim any amount on your W-4. Only the bottom portion needs to be submitted to your employer.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  241. Nicky says:

    hello. I need help. I am married and live with my husband. We have one daughter. We both work but right now he makes more than I do. As of now he will be filing for our daughter. What should I put on my w2? I don’t want too much taken out of my paycheck but I also do not want either of us to owe at the end of the year. Should I put 2 or 3??

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Nicky,

      I would suggest claiming one or two since your husband will be claiming your daughter when he files.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  242. Xavier says:

    Hello I want to know if their is such thing as not getting any taxes taken away every check and just pay the fee when taxes are done. Or how about breaking even so I won’t get anything back for taxes or pay anything back thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Xavier,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  243. Denise says:

    Hi, I am 25 and single. What should claim?

  244. Kevin says:

    Hello

    I recently had my overtime hours cut to a negligible amount. It was a key addition to my paycheck. I am married with no children. I was using Single 0 as my deduction. I was looking for something to prevent a tax bill but still give me more take home pay. Is this unrealistic?

  245. Brooke says:

    Hi, I am single, and have 2 children. I claim my son and my boyfriend claims our daughter. When filling out my W-4, I entered 1 in A and B and 0 in line D. What should I enter on line G? I plan to claim my son, but want more money back at income tax, so do I put 0 on line G and have the total # of allowances at 2 or do I put a 2 on line G and have line 5 as 4?
    Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Brooke,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  246. C.L. Jordan says:

    Hello Tax Advisor,

    I currnently file single. My girlfriend (doesnt work) and her child (age 5) having been living with me for about 6 months. I currently claim 0 on my w4 and they take quite a bit from me bi-weekly. Can i legally claim my girlfriend and her child? If so, what should I claim. I am not so worried about a huge refund, I also dont want to owe either.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi C.L.,

      The number you put on your W-4 is only an estimate for what will be withheld from each of your paychecks throughout the year. This amount can be as high or low as you prefer. However, when it comes to claiming dependents on your tax return, you need to meet the requirements for claiming someone as your dependent. These guidelines are available on the IRS website.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  247. Teresa says:

    hello! I am single, head of household (own a condo), no dependents. I don’t want to owe taxes, the work sheet has me claiming 3, is this appropriate?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Teresa,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  248. Halie says:

    Hi. I am trying to fill out my W4 form, and am coming up with 7 allowances?? That seems like too much to me. I am single, head of household, and have one child. The allowances are 1 to claim myself, 1 for being single and only having one job, 1 for my child, 1 for head of household, 1 because I will have at least $2000 in child care expenses, and 2 under the Child Tax Credit. Will I end up owing a huge amount at the end of the year if I claim 7? Should I claim less?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Halie,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  249. Robert says:

    Thank you for this! Very informative.

    Question: Married, filing jointly, one kid, 6,000 in daycare expenses a year. What should the wife and I claim? I was thinking, 2 and 1? Sound right? We we’re both claiming 0.

  250. jeff says:

    Hi,

    Today I went online to check on all the tax stuff and noticed in my allowences was changed from 4 to 6. I have 3 dependants plus myself. Im assuming one of my kids was messing around on my phone and changed the number. My pay went up by about 100 dollars a period about 3 months ago. So I think thats around when. How will this affect my taxes? Will I owe? I changed it back to 4 for this year.

    Jeff

  251. Citlalli says:

    Hi. I have a question for the W-4. I’m not married, I have a 9 month old baby and I live with my boyfriend. I just started working and for the total number of allowances you are claiming

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Citlalli,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  252. Rod Ville says:

    I’m married, filing jointly, one dependent child, spouse not working. I did my paper work and if did it right I can claim up to 6 allowances, but they suggested me not to. What if what I request does not match what is in my paperwork, which according to what I read I must submit to my employer? I think 3 or 4 should be sensible, but I just want to make sure I’m not doing something wrong.
    Thank you.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Rod Ville,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  253. chris says:

    I am engaged to be married and have had a kid in may of last year. I have three allowances on my paycheck but cant remember what they are. What should I do? How should I file my taxes?

  254. Brianna Ledbetter says:

    My boyfriend is the only one working and only one working and claims his self and our two children, some how he ended up with a total of 9 on his w4, shouldn’t he only end up with a end up with a end total of 3?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Brianna,

      The reason that he ended up with nine is most likely due to the child tax credit.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  255. Asia says:

    Hi,

    I had a baby in July 2014 and have been claiming 2 on my taxes all year for my paychecks. Will I most likely have to owe? I will be filing as single, head of the household with 1 dependent.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Asia,

      Although this will ultimately also depend on your income amount, you should just about break even when filing your taxes based on what you have stated above.

  256. Craig says:

    I am self-employed making round about $50,000 a year, my wife has a full time job making about 28,000 a year. We have three kids and she claims all of them on her check as allowances. Does this hurt me at the end of the year when I don’t my taxes. If so how many allowances should she be claiming on her check

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Craig,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  257. Ciara says:

    Hi
    Im single and I have 0 on my w-4 I support my mom more than 50% she is 50 years old, can I claim her as a dependent?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Ciara,

      I suggest checking on the IRS website that your mother is a “qualifying dependent”. If she meets the qualifications then you can claim her when you file your taxes.

  258. Michele says:

    HI – I am head of household with one child (age 7) where I qualify for the child care tax credit. I used the IRS withholding calculator which says 7 allowances but the form from the employer states 6 allowances. My question is that i would like to assure I can a good tax refund. What is the best to number allowances to achieve this with all the information stated.

    Thank you.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Michele,

      In order to receive a heftier refund, you should claim less on your W4 form.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the directions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim. However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  259. Tyler says:

    Me and my wife both work full time, and I also earn reserve military pay. We have one child and we file jointly. I am thinking about both of us putting married 2 on our full time W4s and Married 0 on my reserve W4. My goal is to break even with no tax return but more in my monthly paychecks. Is this a good idea?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Tyler,

      The answer to your question is also based on a few more factors, including your income amounts. I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  260. Alisha says:

    I claimed 5 allowances on my w-4 form at a new job I started in oct 2014. I am single and have never been married and I have a one year old baby. I have two jobs. One job I’m oncall the other job which was the job I started in oct 2014. Should I have claimed 5 allowances? Or should I have claimed zero ? I’m a bit confused on how this works.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Alisha,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  261. Zach says:

    Hi.

    I am a single teacher and I just received my Master Sheet explaining my pay for the last year. I live on my own. For some reason I claimed 2 exemptions for Federal and State. Is that a bad idea- to claim 2 even though I am single and live by myself? Should I contact my employer and change it to 1, or even 0? What are the pros and cons?

    Thanks so much.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Zach,

      I would consider claiming one on your W-4 as single with one source of income.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  262. Howard says:

    I have one son but he doesn’t stay with me but I pay child support. Can I still put him down on my marital status. Instead of me calming 1. Can I put 2 people me and my son. Even though he don’t live with me but I pay child support.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Howard,

      What you claim on your W-4 does not need to reflect what you file on your taxes.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  263. KM says:

    I am married with 3 kids. I currently have 0 on my W-4. Should I change it to a 2 or 3? My spouse works but my salary is much more. Should I have my spouse select 0 on w-4 and I select another number? This way I could receive a biggie paycheck.

  264. Amitosh says:

    I am married and joined job last yeas March. My wife is not yet any US. I filed as married. But while filing for refunds how to should I file? Will there be anything extra I have to do since I joined mid year into my first job?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Amitosh,

      You will file your taxes with the filing status that you are on the last day of the year. Just be sure to update your pay roll department and the IRS with any major life changes (such as marriage, an address change, etc.).

  265. Brittany says:

    I am married with thee kids. Last year,I did not work. I just started working and My husband claims everyone. From the previous statement: My husband should claim me and my three kids and on my work W-4 I should claim 1 for myself and 0 for my husband (cause he’s working) and 0 for my kids? On the “G” line I would write 3 for each child? Its very confusing and feels extremely ultimate, although it may not be. haha

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Brittany,

      Filling out your W-4 is more of an estimate for the amount to be withheld throughout the year.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  266. Brittany says:

    I am married with thee kids. Last year,I did not work. I just started working and My husband claims everyone. From the previous statement: My husband should claim me and my three kids and on my work W-4 I should claim 1 for myself and 0 for my husband (cause he’s working) and 0 for my kids? On the “G” line I would write 3 for each child? Its very confusing and feels extremely ultimate, although it may not be. haha
    thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Brittany,

      Filling out your W-4 is more of an estimate for the amount to be withheld throughout the year.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  267. Philip says:

    I am married with 3 kids and one on the the way, my wife does not work. How many exemptions do I put on my w-4

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Philip,

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

  268. jr says:

    Hi im maried was wondering if its better for me to file married filling separate im working the wife is not and we have 4 dependents

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jr,

      I would always suggest filing married jointly unless there is a specific reason that you are aware of not to in your situation. This tends to be the most financially beneficial.

  269. Zaqueo says:

    Hi, I work one job as a store manager, and I rent an apartment. Just me, have no dependents, and I claimed 0, was that a smart choice?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Zaqueo,

      Yes, claiming zero allowances will result in the maximum amount of taxes to be withheld from each of your paychecks throughout the year. This will provide you with a higher refund once you file taxes for the year.

  270. KD says:

    I am single with no dependents. I claimed zero exemptions. Was that wrong? I dont have my w2 yet but I was told claiming 0 exemptions could result in no fed taxes bring withheld. Help!

  271. DW says:

    Hi,

    I am single with one job and one child dependent. My job asked us to go over our filling status because of discrepancies. They have my federal tax withholding at : Single. Exemptions “0”. Is that correct?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi DW,

      I would suggest claiming two.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  272. Jillian says:

    Hi there. We recently had our first child last year, as well as both took job changes. My husband works a full time job and occasional shifts part time at a retail store. On our new W4 I claimed 2 and he claimed 1. Is this too much for 2 adults and 1 child? I want to make sure we get a healthy refund.
    Thanks!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Jillian,

      That is what I would suggest claiming.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  273. Recently Relocated says:

    My husband is head of household and works in commission sales…He is 1099. I have a full time job and we have one young son. I have always claimed 0, but recently moved from another state where state and local taxes were not taken. I have received a substantial raise, but I notice state and local taxes are a big chunk, so it does not feel like much of a raise… I am wondering if I should have chosen something other than 0.

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Recently Relocated,

      I would suggest claiming one based on the provided information.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability (or refund) at the end of the year be as close to zero as possible.

  274. Atif says:

    I am single and 25 years old and starting my new job this year. I have no dependents and no one is claiming me as a dependent. Should I have one or two exemptions?

  275. Phil says:

    Hello,

    I am married and have 1 full-time job and 1 part-time job. My wife also works part-time. Currently I have 2 allowances on full-time, 0 on part-time, and my wife has 2 on her part-time. Is this good or would you suggest something else? Thanks

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Phil,

      I suggest that you each claim one on your full-time W-4 forms.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability or refund, at the end of the year, be as close to zero as possible.

  276. Sue says:

    I am married and i just got a job. My husband has been working and he hasn’t changed his w-4 since he was single so his marital status appears single on his paycheck so I assume his allowance on his w-4 is 0 or 1. We have two children together and we have been filing our two children and me as my husband’s dependants on his tax return. What number should i put on my w-4 since i got a job?

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi Sue,

      It is typically most beneficial for the spouse earning the higher income to claim the majority of the allowances on their W-4 form. For example, if you earn the higher income, I suggest that you claim three on your W-4 and your husband claim one on his W-4.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability or refund, at the end of the year, be as close to zero as possible.

      In order to do this, I suggest taking a look at the IRS Withholding Calculator. It only takes a few minutes to complete and will give you the most accurate amount of allowances to claim in order to reach that break-even point at the end of the tax year.

      • Brigid says:

        My scenario is similar. I just got married 2 months ago, and just got a new job a month ago. I claimed 1 on my new W-4. My husband has not changed his status since before he was married, so I believe he is claiming 0 or 1. Am I correct in claiming 1? Or should I be claiming 2?

        • Tax Advisor says:

          Hi Brigid,

          There isn’t a clear-cut right or wrong when it comes to how many allowances to claim on your W-4. It IS important to update your filing status to reflect the filing status you will be reporting on your tax return. The amount of allowances you claim controls how much of your income per paycheck will be withheld to cover taxes owed to the IRS for the year. The more allowances you claim, the less is withheld. The less allowances you claim, the more is withheld. If too much is withheld, you’ll be issued a refund. If too little is withheld, you’ll have a tax bill after filing. The IRS gives you some leeway when choosing how you’ll pay the IRS; throughout the year or in lump sum after filing.

  277. LJ says:

    Single with 1 job and 1 child. How many allowances should I take? I would like less taxes taken out of my paycheck but don’t want to owe at end of yeah. thank you so much!

    • Tax Advisor says:

      Hi LJ,

      I suggest claiming two allowances.

      The general rule is that the more allowances you claim, the less withholding you’ll have taken out of your paycheck each pay period. By following the instructions on the Personal Allowances Worksheet of your W-4 Form, you will calculate the maximum amount that you should claim (Keep in mind that this worksheet will not be given to your employer or the IRS). However, you can always claim less than that to ensure that enough will be withheld from each paycheck. If you claim zero, you’ll have the maximum amount withheld. If you claim a larger amount, you’ll have less withheld. The absolute ideal scenario is to have your tax liability or refund, at the end of the year, be as close to zero as possible.

  278. Maria Hannifin says:

    I Just got married June 14th. 2014. I have two jobs one Full time other is just 8 hrs. a week. NO kids. What number should i put ?? or claim.

  279. Maria Hannifin says:

    also what should my huspand put on his? he just works one Full time job. just so we dont end up paying at the end.